Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

just started using JSLint on some code I bought some time ago. Its critsizing many lines of code... Whats your opinion on these lines? Should I rewrite them, and if so, how could these be fixed?

Problem at line 5 character 23: Use the array literal notation [ ]

var radios = new Array();

Problem at line 22: 'focustextareas' was used before it was defined

function focustextareas(){

Problem at line 125: Expected '===' and instead saw '=='

else if(elem.className=="optionsDivVisible") {elem.className = "optionsDivI...

Problem at line 133: Expected a conditional expression and instead saw an assignment

while(elem = document.getElementById("optionsDiv"+g))

Problem at line 136 character 13: Expected '{' and instead saw 'return'

return g;
share|improve this question
2  
Style checker != debugger. –  delnan Feb 12 '11 at 17:19
    
Thanks for underlining that Delnan - I almost forgot –  Sam Feb 12 '11 at 18:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

JSLint is useful for pointing out common pitfalls in JavaScript and is especially useful for less experienced JavaScript developers. Some of it is sound, pretty much unarguably good advice. However, some of it represents only the views of its author, some of which are highly subjective. Here's my views on the examples you gave:


Problem at line 5 character 23: Use the array literal notation [ ]

Good advice. Array literals are shorter, safer and less ambiguous than using the Array constructor.


Problem at line 22: 'focustextareas' was used before it was defined

Good advice. JavaScript has both function declarations and function expressions, which behave differently in that functions created by function declarations are available in the whole scope in which they are defined whereas those created by function expressions do not. So the following works:

foo();
function foo() {}

... whereas the following does not:

foo(); // TypeError
var foo = function() {};

The problem here is that if you refactored a function declaration to a function expression, your code would stop working if that function was used before it was declared.


Problem at line 125: Expected '===' and instead saw '=='

else if(elem.className=="optionsDivVisible")

Questionable. No need to change. What this is trying to alert you to is that == does type coercion (the rules of which lead to some unintuitive results) whereas === does not. However, in this case both operands are guaranteed to be strings (so long as elem really is a DOM element), in which case === and == are specified to perform exactly the same steps and there is no advantage to using one over the other.


Problem at line 133: Expected a conditional expression and instead saw an assignment

while(elem = document.getElementById("optionsDiv"+g))

Good advice, but no need to change. I find this construction convenient and do use it, but it highlights a potential source of errors: if == or === was intended instead of = then this would not throw an error and lead to difficult-to-diagnose bugs.


Problem at line 136 character 13: Expected '{' and instead saw 'return'

return g;

Unsure. More code needed.

share|improve this answer

Here are my opinions.

Using the literal [] notation is a good practice since it can avoid some confusing circumstances when using the constructor. Also, it's much shorter.

//var radios = new Array();
var radios = [];

The === uses a less complex algorithm and avoids some of the confusion that == can cause, so I'd use === whenever possible.

//else if(elem.className=="optionsDivVisible") {elem.className = "optionsDivI...
else if(elem.className==="optionsDivVisible") {elem.className = "optionsDivI...

I don't personally mind this one.

while(elem = document.getElementById("optionsDiv"+g))

I assume this one is the single statement for the previous while statement. I don't mind it, but at the same time, I don't think it is bad advice to say you should always place your statement in a Block {}.

return g;
share|improve this answer
1  
In the case where the two operands are of the same type, === is specified to use precisely the same steps as ==, so there's no advantage to using === over == in, say, elem.className=="optionsDivVisible", where both operands are guaranteed to be strings. –  Tim Down Feb 13 '11 at 1:19
    
@Tim: Right you are. I hadn't noticed that. Though I do tend to use === unless I have a specific reason to take advantage of the Abstract Equality Comparison. Just my preference. But yes, no advantage here unless a non element object sneaks through. –  user113716 Feb 13 '11 at 1:36

You really should (if you haven't) read the docs for JSLint. The first sentence says: "JSLint will hurt your feelings."

JSLint was written by Doug Crockford and expresses his (very well founded) view of code quality and error prone coding. JSLint finds not only errors but as well "bad coding style". Crockford explains the reasoning behind JSLints suggestion in a very interesting video and in his book "JavaScript: The Good Parts".

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for such an interesting video link! –  Sam Feb 12 '11 at 18:31

5: Use the array literal notation [ ] Many programmers prefer [] cause it's shorter.
22: 'focustextareas' was used before it was defined function may be used before its definition, but in some comlicated cases with closures, this would be a useful warning.
125: Expected '===' and instead saw '==' doesn't matter, class name is always a string.
133: Expected a conditional expression ... just a useful warning.
136: Expected '{' and instead saw 'return' hard to say. This message taken out from context look silly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestions. Makes the hard critique more relative all in all... –  Sam Feb 12 '11 at 18:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.