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These two javascript functions work perfectly on unaltered dom elements. However the delete_route function fails when asked to delete elements appended to the dom via the second function. For clarity, I am only looking at elements where parts[0] is always option - it is created by spliting the a > id on the "_".

Why is Javascript apparently seeing this difference between "native" dom objects and inserted objects?

//handle delete events
function delete_route (parts) {
  if (parts[0] == "field") {

    var select_container = "container_"+parts[2];
    var getContainer = document.getElementById(select_container);

   getContainer.parentNode.removeChild(getContainer);

  } else if (parts[0] == "option") {
    var optionId = parts[0]+"_"+parts[2]+"_"+parts[3];
    var getOption = document.getElementById(optionId);

   getOption.parentNode.removeChild(getOption);
  }
}

//handle new events
function new_route (parts) {
   var highest_number = -1;

  if (parts[0] == "field") {
  } else if (parts[0] == "option") {
    var selectContainer = "container_"+parts[2];
    var thisContainer = document.getElementById(selectContainer);

    //get last option id (for new object tagging)
    var optionList = thisContainer.getElementsByTagName("input");
    var optionListLength = optionList.length -2;

    //more accurate new node placement than last option which didn't work correctly anyway
    lastChild = "options_wrapper_"+parts[2];
    var lastChildNode = document.getElementById(lastChild);

     //generate option
    var labelNode = document.createElement ("label");
    var inputNode = document.createElement ("input");
    var linkNode  = document.createElement ("a");
    var breakNode = document.createElement ("br");

    inputNode.setAttribute("type", "text");
    var inputNodeId = parts[0]+"_"+parts[2]+"_"+optionListLength;
    inputNode.setAttribute("id", inputNodeId);
    inputNode.setAttribute("name", inputNodeId);
    inputNode.setAttribute("value", "Undefined");

    labelNode.setAttribute ("for", inputNodeId);
    var labelNodeText = document.createTextNode ("Option Value");

    linkNode.setAttribute("href", "#");
    var linkId = parts[0]+"_delete_"+parts[2]+"_"+optionListLength;
    linkNode.setAttribute("id", linkId);
    var linkNodeText = document.createTextNode ("Delete option");

    lastChildNode.appendChild (labelNode);
    labelNode.appendChild (labelNodeText);
    lastChildNode.appendChild (inputNode);
    lastChildNode.appendChild (linkNode);
    linkNode.appendChild (linkNodeText);
    lastChildNode.appendChild (breakNode);

  }
}

HTML this applies to (I have gone though some effort with the creating part - options that were inserted by javascript are exactly indentical to "native" page elements):

         <div id="options_wrapper_7">
    <label for="option_7_0">Option Value</label><input type=text id="option_7_0" name="option_7_0" value="Red"> <a id="option_delete_7_0" href="#">Delete option</a><br>

<label for="option_7_1">Option Value</label><input type=text id="option_7_1" name="option_7_1" value="Green"><a id="option_delete_7_1" href="#">Delete option</a><br>

<label for="option_7_2">Option Value</label><input type=text id="option_7_2" name="option_7_2" value="Blue"><a id="option_delete_7_2" href="#">Delete option</a><br>

</div>
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the code from your previous questions, you're assigning event handlers at window.onload by calling the clickDetection() function.

I assume when you've created new elements, you haven't bothered to give those new elements the same event handlers that your initial clickDetection() does.

If that's the case, you'll need to be sure that those new elements get handlers that can respond to clicks.

   // make a separate reference to the handler so we can use it
   //    for elements that are created later.
function clickHandler() {
    clickRoute(this);
    return false
};

function clickDetection() {
    var canvas = document.getElementById("content");
    var dumbLinks = canvas.getElementsByTagName("a");
    for (var i = 0; i < dumbLinks.length; i++) {
             // Assign the "clickHandler" when the page loads
        dumbLinks[i].onclick = clickHandler; 
    }
}

Then in your new_route function, manually assign clickHandler to the new <a> element.

function new_route (parts) {
   var highest_number = -1;

  if (parts[0] == "field") {
  } else if (parts[0] == "option") {
    var selectContainer = "container_"+parts[2];
    var thisContainer = document.getElementById(selectContainer);

    //get last option id (for new object tagging)
    var optionList = thisContainer.getElementsByTagName("input");
    var optionListLength = optionList.length -2;

    //more accurate new node placement than last option which didn't work correctly anyway
    lastChild = "options_wrapper_"+parts[2];
    var lastChildNode = document.getElementById(lastChild);

     //generate option
    var labelNode = document.createElement ("label");
    var inputNode = document.createElement ("input");
    var linkNode  = document.createElement ("a");
    var breakNode = document.createElement ("br");

       // ********RIGHT HERE*********
       // Assign the handler to the new "linkNode" element
    linkNode.onclick = clickHandler;

   // ...and so on with the rest of the code...

}
share|improve this answer
    
so call that function after inserting the new elements? Will try anyway, but just got called away! –  YsoL8 Feb 12 '11 at 17:55
    
@YsoL8: No, that would re-assign the handlers to the previous elements. I'll update my answer with a solution that will let you assign the handler as you create the element. –  user113716 Feb 12 '11 at 17:56
    
Hi Patrick. I keep getting caught by behaviour I don't expect! Could you let me know how the clickHandler can work without explictly passing the parts variable to it? I like to have 100% understanding of the code I'm using for bug fixing down the road. –  YsoL8 Feb 12 '11 at 19:13
    
@YsoL8: What the handler does is it calls the clickRoute() function, and passes this as the argument. In a handler, this refers to the element that was clicked. Then in the clickRoute() function, it gets the ID from the element, and splits it on the _ character. var linkParts = linkId.split("_"); This is where your parts is coming from. It expects the item at index [1] to have either "new" or "delete", and it calls the proper function. –  user113716 Feb 12 '11 at 19:46

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