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I don't understand what Twitter is doing or how it's making Twitter adapt to browsers via CSS, but I saw this link in the source: http://a2.twimg.com/a/1297446951/stylesheets/newtwitter.css?1297453395 What does the 1297453395 do? Does it have anything to do with how Twitter adapts to browsers? I noticed that Twitter only uses -moz- on Firefox and only uses -webkit- on Chrome. I'm very interested in this.

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I see both -moz- and -webkit- vendor extensions in the same stylesheet. I'm using Firefox. –  BoltClock Feb 12 '11 at 19:54
    
This would be considered a GET –  jerluc Feb 12 '11 at 19:59
    
I recall, on Chrome, that inspecting the topbar only revealed a webkit background gradient. Though in some other places I see both. That's strange. –  guydude Feb 12 '11 at 20:00
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I think Chrome simply ignores anything it doesn't recognize (same goes for Firefox). –  BoltClock Feb 12 '11 at 20:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

All it does is cause a browser to retrieve the file without bothering about caching. The query string at the end makes a browser think it's a brand new file that it has to request. It has nothing to do with CSS or browser adaptation, and everything to do with HTTP.

Specifically, the 1297453395 represents a UNIX timestamp.

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Oh, I thought it was something more interesting. Oh well. –  guydude Feb 12 '11 at 19:58
    
Likely a timestamp of when the file was last changed. –  thirtydot Feb 12 '11 at 19:59

A HTTP request from a browser usually contains some information about that browser (User-Agent header). It’s not reliable information since it can easily be spoofed but it’s enough to deliver browser-specific CSS.

The query parameter is completely unnecessary (and indeed useless) to determine the client browser.

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Actually the css file is not a real css file. it's a HTTP handler that returns of type "text/css".

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