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Given: A patient has many doctors and doctors have multiple patients.

What is the difference between the following two schemas?

  • Option 1: Association Table
    • Patient[id, data1]
    • Doctor[id, data2]
    • Patient_Doctor[patient_id, doctor_id]
  • Option 2: A single foreign key
    • Patient[id, data1, doctor_id]
    • Doctor[id, data2]

The only thing I can think of is that option 2 requires you to duplicate data1 multiple times and if data1 is large performance will suffer. Is that correct?

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If you consider the data duplication in Option 2 acceptable, then why not just go with Option 3: Patient_Doctor[patient_id, doctor_id, data1, data2] ? –  mbeckish Feb 12 '11 at 22:19
    
Also, the title of your question isn't accurate. Your 2 options aren't association table vs. single foreign key. In both cases, you have an association table (i.e. a table whose key is comprised of the keys of 2 different entities). The only difference is that, in Option 2, you don't have a standalone table for the Patient entity. –  mbeckish Feb 12 '11 at 22:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only thing I can think of is that option 2 requires you to duplicate data1 multiple times and if data1 is large performance will suffer. Is that correct?

No, that's not correct. "Option 2", in which patient.id is presumably the primary key, prevents you from inserting more than one row for each patient. So each patient can have one and only one doctor. That doesn't work in the general case: a primary care doctor might refer a patient to an allergist, a gastroenterologist, an oncologist, and so on.

For fun, consider the fact that doctors themselves have doctors.

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Good catch. I could add a non-primary-key field that uniquely identifies the patient and treat patient.id as an artificial key but then I'd lose the performance benefits of indexed look-ups. –  Gili Feb 13 '11 at 0:16
2  
No. If you added a column that uniquely identifies the patient--which means adding another candidate key--then that column's value would prevent you from inserting more than one row for each patient. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 13 '11 at 0:45

Exactly, option 2 is a 1 to many relationship. So each patient will have to duplicated multiple times which goes against database normalization.

Your case, is many to many relationship and thats why you need the relation table.

Option 2 is not a question of performance, but of design, a patient can have a lot of fields related to him that you dont want to duplicate (medicare, adress, phone, etc...)

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