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So pip and virtualenv sound wonderful compared to setuptools. Being able to uninstall would be great. But my project is already using setuptools, so how do I migrate? The web sites I've been able to find so far are very vague and general. So here's an anthology of questions after reading the main web sites and trying stuff out:

  • First of all, are virtualenv and pip supposed to be in a usable state by now? If not, please disregard the rest as the ravings of a madman.
  • How should virtualenv be installed? I'm not quite ready to believe it's as convoluted as explained elsewhere.
  • Is there a set of tested instructions for how to install matplotlib in a virtual environment? For some reason it always wants to compile it here instead of just installing a package, and it always ends in failure (even after build-dep which took up 250 MB of disk space). After a whole bunch of warnings it prints src/mplutils.cpp:17: error: ‘vsprintf’ was not declared in this scope.
  • How does either tool interact with setup.py? pip is supposed to replace easy_install, but it's not clear whether it's a drop-in or more complicated relationship.
  • Is virtualenv only for development mode, or should the users also install it?
  • Will the resulting package be installed with the minimum requirements (like the current egg), or will it be installed with sources & binaries for all dependencies plus all the build tools, creating a gigabyte monster in the virtual environment?
  • Will the users have to modify their $PATH and $PYTHONPATH to run the resulting package if it's installed in a virtual environment?
  • Do I need to create a script from a text string for virtualenv like in the bad old days?
  • What is with the #egg=Package URL syntax? That's not part of the standard URL, so why isn't it a separate parameter?
  • Where is @rev included in the URL? At the end I suppose, but the documentation is not clear about this ("You can also include @rev in the URL").
  • What is supposed to be understood by using an existing requirements file as "as a sort of template for the new file"? This could mean any number of things.
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AFAIK, pip and virtualenv are not replacements for setuptools. distribute is the suggested replacement for setuptools, pip replaces easy_install, and virtualenv is its own special thing. The first two allow the package maintainer describes how to install the package, the next two help the installer keep track of what its installed (and install dependencies), and the last lets the user easily switch among multiple collections of installed packages (e.g. different versions of the same package). –  AFoglia Feb 13 '11 at 3:46
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2 Answers 2

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Wow, that's quite a set of questions. Many of them would really deserve their own SO question with more details. I'll do my best:

First of all, are virtualenv and pip supposed to be in a usable state by now?

Yes, although they don't serve everyone's needs. Pip and virtualenv (along with everything else in Python package management) are far from perfect, but they are widely used and depended upon nonetheless.

How should virtualenv be installed? I'm not quite ready to believe it's as convoluted as explained elsewhere.

The answer you link is complex because it is trying to avoid making any changes at all to your global Python installation and install everything in ~/.local instead. This has some advantages, but is more complex to setup. It's also installing virtualenvwrapper, which is a set of convenience bash scripts for working with virtualenv, but is not necessary for using virtualenv.

If you are on Ubuntu, aptitude install python-setuptools followed by easy_install virtualenv should get you a working virtualenv installation without doing any damage to your global python environment (unless you also had the Ubuntu virtualenv package installed, which I don't recommend as it will likely be an old version).

Is there a set of tested instructions for how to install matplotlib in a virtual environment? For some reason it always wants to compile it here instead of just installing a package, and it always ends in failure (even after build-dep which took up 250 MB of disk space). After a whole bunch of warnings it prints src/mplutils.cpp:17: error: ‘vsprintf’ was not declared in this scope.

It "always wants to compile" because pip, by design, installs only from source, it doesn't install pre-compiled binaries. This is a controversial choice, and is probably the primary reason why pip has seen widest adoption among Python web developers, who use more pure-Python packages and commonly develop and deploy in POSIX environments where a working compilation chain is standard.

The reason for the design choice is that providing precompiled binaries has a combinatorial explosion problem with different platforms and build architectures (including python version, UCS-2 vs UCS-4 python builds, 32 vs 64-bit...). The way easy_install finds the right binary package on PyPI sort of works, most of the time, but doesn't account for all these factors and can break. So pip just avoids that issue altogether (replacing it with a requirement that you have a working compilation environment).

In many cases, packages that require C compilation also have a slower-moving release schedule and it's acceptable to simply install OS packages for them instead. This doesn't allow working with different versions of them in different virtualenvs, though.

I don't know what's causing your compilation error, it works for me (on Ubuntu 10.10) with this series of commands:

virtualenv --no-site-packages tmp
. tmp/bin/activate
pip install numpy
pip install -f http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/matplotlib/matplotlib/matplotlib-1.0.1/matplotlib-1.0.1.tar.gz matplotlib

The "-f" link is necessary to get the most recent version, due to matplotlib's unusual download URLs on PyPI.

How does either tool interact with setup.py? pip is supposed to replace easy_install, but it's not clear whether it's a drop-in or more complicated relationship.

The setup.py file is a convention of distutils, the Python standard library's package management "solution." distutils alone is missing some key features, and setuptools is a widely-used third-party package that "embraces and extends" distutils to provide some additional features. setuptools also uses setup.py. easy_install is the installer bundled with setuptools. Setuptools development stalled for several years, and distribute was a fork of setuptools to fix some longstanding bugs. Eventually the fork was resolved with a merge of distribute back into setuptools, and setuptools development is now active again (with a new maintainer).

distutils2 was a mostly-rewritten new version of distutils that attempted to incorporate the best ideas from setuptools/distribute, and was supposed to become part of the Python standard library. Unfortunately this effort failed, so for the time being setuptools remains the de facto standard for Python packaging.

Pip replaces easy_install, but it does not replace setuptools; it requires setuptools and builds on top of it. Thus it also uses setup.py.

Is virtualenv only for development mode, or should the users also install it?

There's no single right answer to that; it can be used either way. In the end it's really your user's choice, and your software ideally should be able to be installed inside or out of a virtualenv; though you might choose to document and emphasize one approach or the other. It depends very much on who your users are and what environments they are likely to need to install your software into.

Will the resulting package be installed with the minimum requirements (like the current egg), or will it be installed with sources & binaries for all dependencies plus all the build tools, creating a gigabyte monster in the virtual environment?

If a package that requires compilation is installed via pip, it will need to be compiled from source. That also applies to any dependencies that require compilation.

This is unrelated to the question of whether you use a virtualenv. easy_install is available by default in a virtualenv and works just fine there. It can install pre-compiled binary eggs, just like it does outside of a virtualenv.

Will the users have to modify their $PATH and $PYTHONPATH to run the resulting package if it's installed in a virtual environment?

In order to use anything installed in a virtualenv, you need to use the python binary in the virtualenv's bin/ directory (or another script installed into the virtualenv that references this binary). The most common way to do this is to use the virtualenv's activate or activate.bat script to temporarily modify the shell PATH so the virtualenv's bin/ directory is first. Modifying PYTHONPATH is not generally useful or necessary with virtualenv.

Do I need to create a script from a text string for virtualenv like in the bad old days?

No.

What is with the #egg=Package URL syntax? That's not part of the standard URL, so why isn't it a separate parameter?

The "#egg=projectname-version" URL fragment hack was first introduced by setuptools and easy_install. Since easy_install scrapes links from the web to find candidate distributions to install for a given package name and version, this hack allowed package authors to add links on PyPI that easy_install could understand, even if they didn't use easy_install's standard naming conventions for their files.

Where is @rev included in the URL? At the end I suppose, but the documentation is not clear about this ("You can also include @rev in the URL").

A couple sentences after that quoted fragment there is a link to "read the requirements file format to learn about other features." The @rev feature is fully documented and demonstrated there.

What is supposed to be understood by using an existing requirements file as "as a sort of template for the new file"? This could mean any number of things.

The very next sentence says "it will keep the packages listed in devel-req.txt in order and preserve comments." I'm not sure what would be a better concise description.

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Wow, thanks! Lots of food for thought here. –  l0b0 Mar 7 '11 at 10:18
    
Really appreciate the question and descriptive solution like this :) –  Drake Apr 17 '12 at 6:23
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I can't answer all your questions, but hopefully the following helps.

Both virtualenv and pip are very usable. Many Python devs use these everyday.

Since you have a working easy_install, the easiest way to install both is the following:

easy_install pip
easy_install virtualenv

Once you have virtualenv, just type virtualenv yourEnvName and you'll get your new python virtual environment in a directory named yourEnvName.

From there, it's as easy as source yourEnvName/bin/activate and the virtual python interpreter will be your active. I know nothing about matplotlib, but following the installation interactions should work out ok unless there are weird hard-coded path issues.

If you can install something via easy_install you can usually install it via pip. I haven't found anything that easy_install could do that pip couldn't.

I wouldn't count on users being able to install virtualenv (it depends on who your users are). Technically, a virtual python interpreter can be treated as a real one for most cases. It's main use is not cluttering up the real interpreter's site-packages and if you have two libraries/apps that require different and incompatible versions of the same library.

If you or a user install something in a virtualenv, it won't be available in other virtualenvs or the system Python interpreter. You'll need to use source /path/to/yourvirtualenv/bin/activate command to switch to a virtual environment you installed the library on.

What they mean by "as a sort of template for the new file" is that the pip freeze -r devel-req.txt > stable-req.txt command will create a new file stable-req.txt based on the existing file devel-req.txt. The only difference will be anything installed not already specified in the existing file will be in the new file.

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