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I would like to represent a structure containing 250 M states(1 bit each) somehow into as less memory as possible (100 k maximum). The operations on it are set/get. I cold not say that it's dense or sparse, it may vary. The language I want to use is C.

I looked at other threads here to find something suitable also. A probabilistic structure like Bloom filter for example would not fit because of the possible false answers.

Any suggestions please?

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If you know nothing about the usage pattern then I don't think you can do anything clever to compress it; compression usually only works when you have some assumptions about how your data is going to look. What setup are you in where you need 250M different bit values? Perhaps there's a better way of encoding this? Or perhaps you have some assumptions you can make? –  templatetypedef Feb 12 '11 at 23:22
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Are you saying you want 250,000,000 independent binary digits? You're not going to fit that 100 kb. It's simply not possible. –  Tristan Feb 12 '11 at 23:23
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im not sure exactly what you want, if it is dense and you have 250,000,000 values to store, even using single bits you are still looking at about 30MB of space to store all 250M. so either the array has to be sparse, or there has to be something in the pattern that you can exploit to compress your data. when you know this you also have to consider what type of access patterns you want. e.g. will you be accessing random values or getting blocks of sequential values at a time, etc... –  Jesse Cohen Feb 12 '11 at 23:24
    
How can I fit 25 pounds in a 5 pound bag? –  Cody Gray Feb 13 '11 at 8:27
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6 Answers

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The size of the structure depends on the entropy of the information. You cannot squeeze information something in less than a given size if you have no repeated pattern. The worst case would still be about 32Mb of storage in your case. If you know something about the relation between the bits then it's maybe possible...

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If you know your data might be sparse, then you could use run-length encoding. But otherwise, there's no way you can compress it.

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I don't think it's possible to do what you're asking. If you need to cover 250 million states of 1 bit each, you'd need 250Mbits/8 = 31.25MBytes. A far cry from 100KBytes.

You'd typically create a large array of bytes, and use functions to determine the byte (index >> 3) and bit position (index & 0x07) to set/clear/get.

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250M bits will take 31.25 megabytes to store (assuming 8 bits/byte, of course), much much more than your 100k goal.

The only way to beat that is to start taking advantage of some sparseness or pattern in your data.

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The max number of bits you can store in 100K of mem is 819,200 bits. This is assuming that 1 K = 1024 bytes, and 1 byte = 8 bits.

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are files possible in your environment ? if so, you might swap, say for example 4k sized segmented bit buffer. your solution shoud access those bits in a serialized way to minimize disk load/save operation.

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