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I have a very basic UPDATE SQL -

UPDATE HOLD_TABLE Q SET Q.TITLE = 'TEST' WHERE Q.ID = 101;

This query runs fine in Oracle, Derby, My-Sql - but it fails in SQL server 2008 with following error: "Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Line 1 Incorrect syntax near 'Q'."

If I remove all occurrences of the alias, "Q" from SQL then it works.

But I need to use the alias.

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4  
Why do you need to use an alias? It doesn't seem like you need it. –  Mark Byers Feb 12 '11 at 23:59
1  
Yes - from the programming perspective I do not need it. But I have an existing/old library which generates all kind of DML SQLs with table aliases. The library has lot of classes with a kind of complex logic. Now getting rid of table-aliases in the library is more work than tweaking the existing logic to work for MSSQL. Also when multiple tables are involved, I do need to have table-alias. –  javauser71 Feb 14 '11 at 6:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 83 down vote accepted

The syntax for using an alias in an update statement on SQL Server is as follows:

UPDATE Q
SET Q.TITLE = 'TEST'
FROM HOLD_TABLE Q
WHERE Q.ID = 101;

The alias should not be necessary here though.

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Yes !!! It works. Thanks for the quick response. By any chance do you know why MSSQL server supports such unconventional syntax for update? –  javauser71 Feb 14 '11 at 6:02
    
Mark Byers - Great Answer!! This syntax allows me to add a commented out Select statement, which allows me to test the update by doing the select first (highlight from the select down and execute): SET Q.TITLE = 'TEST' -- SELECT * –  user1636464 Aug 30 '12 at 15:25

You can always take the CTE, (Common Tabular Expression), approach.

;WITH updateCTE AS
(
    SELECT ID, TITLE 
    FROM HOLD_TABLE
    WHERE ID = 101
)

UPDATE updateCTE
SET TITLE = 'TEST';
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Yes - it also works. But for a JDBC/Java program this is a kind of complex syntax. Thanks for your response. –  javauser71 Feb 14 '11 at 6:17

There are some circumstances in which not having a table alias make the SQL almost unreadable. Consider here a situation in which you are updating a column called Account from another table with the same-named column. You need to specify the table name because otherwise the table name is ambiguous.

update LMDATA.dbo.ExtremelyLongAndContortedTableNameThatYouReallyOnlyWantToSpecifyOnce
set Currency = ac.Currency,
CurrencyID = dc.ID
from LMDATA.dbo.AnotherReallyLongTableNameThatCanBeAliased ac
join dCurrencies dc
on dc.Name = ac.Currency
where LMDATA.dbo.ExtremelyLongAndContortedTableNameThatYouReallyOnlyWantToSpecifyOnce.Account =   ac.Account

This becomes

update Q
set Q.Currency = ac.Currency,
CurrencyID = dc.ID
from LMDATA.dbo.ExtremelyLongAndContortedTableNameThatYouReallyOnlyWantToSpecifyOnce Q
join LMDATA.dbo.AnotherReallyLongTableNameThatCanBeAliased ac
on Q.Account = ac.Account
join dCurrencies dc
on dc.Name = ac.Currency`
share|improve this answer

You don't need the alias. You can just do:

UPDATE HOLD_TABLE SET TITLE = 'TEST' WHERE ID = 101;
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes - from the programming perspective I do not need it. But I have an existing/old library which generates all kind of DML SQLs with table aliases. The library has lot of classes with a kind of complex logic. Now getting rid of table-aliases in the library is more work than tweaking the existing logic to work for MSSQL. Also when multiple tables are involved, I do need to have table-alias. –  javauser71 Feb 14 '11 at 6:10

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