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I am trying to combine multiple commands into a single output.

#!/bin/bash

x=$(date +%Y)
x=$($x date +m%)

echo "$x"

This returns

./test.sh: line 4: 2011: command not found

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted
x=$(echo $(date +%Y) $(date +%m))

(Note that you've transposed the characters % and m in the month format.)

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3  
There's no point using echo like that -- it doesn't add anything since you're just giving it a string and then capturing that same string again. You can just do x="$(date +%Y) $(date +%m)" –  John Bartholomew Feb 13 '11 at 0:54
    
@John Bartholomew, you're right, it's a habit because I tend immediately to pipe echo to sed, etc. –  rlibby Feb 13 '11 at 1:08

In the second line, you're trying to execute $x date +m%. At this point, $x will be set to the year, 2011. So now it's trying to run this command:

2011 date +%m

Which is not what you want.

You could either do this:

x=$(date +%Y)
y=$(date +%m)

echo "$x $y"

Or that:

x=$(date +%Y)
x="$x $(date +%m)"

echo "$x"

Or simply use the final date format straight away:

x=$(date "+%Y %m")
echo $x
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You have a typo/copy-paste error: you're still using $y in your second example. –  John Bartholomew Feb 13 '11 at 1:01
    
Thanks :) Fixed. –  puzzle Feb 13 '11 at 1:12

Maybe this?

#!/bin/bash

x=$(date +%Y)
x="$x$(date +%m)"

echo "$x"

...also correcting what appears to be a transpose in the format string you passed to date the second time around.

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Semicolon to separate commands on the command line.

date +%Y ; date +m%

Or if you only want to run the second command if the first one succeeds, use double ampersand:

date +%Y && date +%m

Or if you want to run both commands simultaneously, mixing their output unpredictably (probably not what you want, but I thought I'd be thorough), use a single ampersand:

date +%Y & date +%m
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echo ´date +%Y´ ´date +m%´

Note the reverse accent (´)

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1  
Except that you're using the wrong character. And $() is preferred. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 13 '11 at 0:57
    
Thanks, while I answer the question I was on Windows. –  Alberto Feb 13 '11 at 10:49
echo `date +%Y` `date +%m`

And to make the minimum change to the OP:

x=$(date +%Y)
x="$x $(date +%m)"
echo "$x"
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