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I would like to use python's subprocess library to deal with a string, process this string in a different program, then collect it and save it. Unfortunately, this string is very long (as in millions of characters long). So I have the following code segment set up:

cmd = ['some command']
p1 = Popen(cmd, stdin=PIPE, stdout=PIPE, stderr=STDOUT)
result = p1.communicate(input='some string')

Where 'some string' is actually millions of characters long.

And I always get this error:

OSError: [Errno 32] Broken pipe

I've tried it on shorter strings and the code works, so I'm guessing I'm maxing out the pipe buffer.

Is there any reasonable solution to this without having to resort to creating temporary files?

There are several constraints that make using subprocess the most attractive and simplest solution for me right now, which is why I'd like a solution within python and within subprocess.

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broken pipe can also mean the child process died of other causes. Invalid input or out-of-memory could be culprits. Have you tried changing command to something like cat? –  SpliFF Feb 13 '11 at 1:31
    
@SpliFF Shoot. You're right. I tried cat and tr and they both worked fine. So it's the other program that's causing problems. Thanks! If you change your comment to an answer, I'd be happy to select it. Or would that be pointless? –  JasonMond Feb 13 '11 at 1:42
    
not to me, i'm chasing 10k :) –  SpliFF Feb 13 '11 at 1:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

broken pipe can also mean the child process died of other causes. Invalid input or out-of-memory could be culprits. Have you tried changing command to something like cat?

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Thanks! Unfortunately, I don't have enough reputation to vote you up. Sorry about that. –  JasonMond Feb 13 '11 at 1:47
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If you are sending millions of characters through input, then something is clearly wrong with the architecture of the program. Normally under those situations the program reads in chunks for those inputs.

Having said that, there is a possibility to use a file as STDIN for subprocess. This may cause the same problem for large inputs too.

Also without Python/subprocess, how do you pass such a long input to your program?

>>> import subprocess
>>> fo = open('filewithinput')
>>> proc = subprocess.Popen(['cat'],stdin=fo,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
>>> out,err = proc.communicate()
>>> fo.close()
>>> print out
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For example, from a *nix commandline, you can do something like "cat * | tr -c 'a-z' ' ' | grep -v '^$' | sort", even if the outut of 'cat *' is a very long string. Sorry if I wasn't clear that when I meant string, I meant string including newline characters. So I'd like to do something like that from within python regardless of what something like 'cat *' generates. –  JasonMond Feb 13 '11 at 1:11
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