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I have a lot of images with a thick white border around them. What's the easiest way for me to remove/isolate these borders? Anyway I can do this using OpenCV?

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Post an example representative image. Are the borders all the same width? Are they parallel to the image boundary (so vertical and horizontal only) or at an angle? Be specific. –  misha Feb 13 '11 at 23:51
    
As misha asked before, do the images all have the same border width? Then the problem becomes quite simple: if the width of border is say w then create a cvRect with x and y = w, width=(img->width - 2*w) and height=(img->height - 2*w). Basically create a rectangle that excludes the border region. Then just use the 'setImageROI()` to set the image's ROI to the rectangle and save it. –  AruniRC Feb 14 '11 at 12:34
    
The borders aren't the same width, but are always horizontal and vertical and not at an angle. So, it's unclear where the border ends and the image begins. I thought of binary searching for a row (in the case of a horizontal border), but instead just went with a scan that begins at a fixed number of rows/columns into the image. A bit slow, but it works. –  Andy Feb 15 '11 at 1:30

2 Answers 2

One approach would be to use quad-tree decomposition such that the border area is a "leaf" node. Then you can subtract it out.

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Not a very elegant solution, but here's my first attempt.

            if( direction == BORDER_SEARCH_DIRECTION.TOP || 
            direction == BORDER_SEARCH_DIRECTION.BOTTOM )
        {
            for (int y = startY; y >= 0 && y < _image.Height; y += deltaY)
            {
                bool foundNonWhite = false;
                for (int x = startX; x < _image.Width; x += deltaX)
                {
                    if (Convert.ToInt32(_image.ManagedArray.GetValue(y, x, 0)) < BORDER_WHITENESS_THRESHOLD)
                    {
                        foundNonWhite = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if (!foundNonWhite)
                {
                    borderAt = y;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

Basically, this assumes that a border will start at most a fifth of the way into the image from the top/bottom, and it searches for the first row that is completely "white". I run the routine twice and if I find an entire row of white on the top and bottom of the image, I assume we have a border.

Damn thing takes 250 milliseconds.

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