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I've heard that it should be possible to do a lossless rotation on a jpeg image. That means you do the rotation in the frequency domain without an IDCT. I've tried to google it but haven't found anything. Could someone bring some light to this?

What I mean by lossless is that I don't lose any additional information in the rotation. And of course that's probably only possible when rotating multiples of 90 degrees.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You do not need to IDCT an image to rotate it losslessly (note that lossless rotation for raster images is only possible for angles that are multiples of 90 degrees).

The following steps achieve a transposition of the image, in the DCT domain:

  1. transpose the elements of each DCT block
  2. transpose the positions of each DCT block

I'm going to assume you can already do the following:

  • Grab the raw DCT coefficients from the JPEG image (if not, see here)
  • Write the coefficients back to the file (if you want to save the rotated image)

I can't show you the full code, because it's quite involved, but here's the bit where I IDCT the image (note the IDCT is for display purposes only):

Size s = coeff.size();
Mat result = cv::Mat::zeros(s.height, s.width, CV_8UC1);

for (int i = 0; i < s.height - DCTSIZE + 1; i += DCTSIZE)
for (int j = 0; j < s.width  - DCTSIZE + 1; j += DCTSIZE)
{
    Rect rect = Rect(j, i, DCTSIZE, DCTSIZE);
    Mat dct_block = cv::Mat::Mat(coeff, rect);
    idct_step(dct_block, i/DCTSIZE, j/DCTSIZE, result);
}

This is the image that is shown:

Lenna

Nothing fancy is happening here -- this is just the original image.

Now, here's the code that implements both the transposition steps I mentioned above:

Size s = coeff.size();
Mat result = cv::Mat::zeros(s.height, s.width, CV_8UC1);

for (int i = 0; i < s.height - DCTSIZE + 1; i += DCTSIZE)
for (int j = 0; j < s.width  - DCTSIZE + 1; j += DCTSIZE)
{
    Rect rect = Rect(j, i, DCTSIZE, DCTSIZE);
    Mat dct_block = cv::Mat::Mat(coeff, rect);
    Mat dct_bt(cv::Size(DCTSIZE, DCTSIZE), coeff.type());
    cv::transpose(dct_block, dct_bt);                // First transposition
    idct_step(dct_bt, j/DCTSIZE, i/DCTSIZE, result); // Second transposition, swap i and j
}

This is the resulting image:

transposed

You can see that the image is now transposed. To achieve proper rotation, you need to combine reflection with transposition.

EDIT

Sorry, I forgot that reflection is also not trivial. It also consists of two steps:

  1. Obviously, reflect the positions of each DCT block in the required axis
  2. Less obviously, invert (multiply by -1) each odd row OR column in each DCT block. If you're flipping vertically, invert odd rows. If you're flipping horizontally, invert odd columns.

Here's code that performs a vertical reflection after the transposition.

for (int i = 0; i < s.height - DCTSIZE + 1; i += DCTSIZE)
for (int j = 0; j < s.width  - DCTSIZE + 1; j += DCTSIZE)
{
    Rect rect = Rect(j, i, DCTSIZE, DCTSIZE);
    Mat dct_block = cv::Mat::Mat(coeff, rect);

    Mat dct_bt(cv::Size(DCTSIZE, DCTSIZE), coeff.type());
    cv::transpose(dct_block, dct_bt);

    // This is the less obvious part of the reflection.
    Mat dct_flip = dct_bt.clone();
    for (int k = 1; k < DCTSIZE; k += 2)
    for (int l = 0; l < DCTSIZE; ++l)
        dct_flip.at<double>(k, l) *= -1;

    // This is the more obvious part of the reflection.
    idct_step(dct_flip, (s.width - j - DCTSIZE)/DCTSIZE, i/DCTSIZE, result);
}

Here's the image you get:

final

You will note that this constitutes a rotation by 90 degrees counter-clockwise.

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1  
A program called jpegtran jpegclub.org/jpegtran implementing all this is included in libjpeg jpegclub.org –  datenwolf Feb 13 '11 at 15:39
    
Thanks for a very good explanation. –  onemasse Feb 13 '11 at 19:44
    
@datenwolf: thanks. Definitely better to use that than to roll your own. Not as fun, though :) –  misha Feb 13 '11 at 23:11

Disclaimer: :-)

Admittedly I know the JPEG compression algorithm only at a very superficial level. What I know comes from Rick Booth's slightly dated, but excellent book Inner Loops, chapter 17: JPEG.

I do not have a complete answer to your question, rather I have a vague idea of what the solution might be. Maybe that will already be helpful to you. To be honest, I would actually be somewhat surprised to see that I have it correct.


Lossless rotation of a JPEG image seems only possible if you wouldn't have to decode it first using a IDCT, and then re-encode it again once you've rotated the image, since that's two computational steps where information loss may happen.

This seems feasible at all because an image encoded as JPEG is already in the frequency domain, as a DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform) has already been performed on it. Let me cite one short passage from the above book (p. 325):

Usually referred to as the DCT […]. Conceptually, what happens is that the 8 × 8 piece of the image gets multiplied by two other 8 × 8 matrices to produce a derivative 8 × 8 matrix. […]

Ordinarily, two 8 × 8 matrix multiplications would require 1,204 (64 × 8 × 2) multiplication steps. Part of the magic of the DCT is that the very special matrices chosen for this step have a lot of internal symmetries, so there is a way to execute the math with only 80 multiplication steps. It is this symmetry that saves the day for JPEG and keeps the algorithm fairly fast. — (emphasis added by me.)

I could imagine that the symmetries in the DCT transformation matrices make it possible to later rotate the transformed 8 × 8 matrices at some very specific angles without perceptually altering the image (apart from the fact that it's rotated, of course). At a conceptual level, what I mean is this: Let's say you had transformed the original 8 × 8 pixel blocks using matrices such as the following:

                * . . . . . . *
                . * . . . . * .
                . . * . . * . .
                . . . * * . . .
                . . . * * . . .
                . . * . . * . .
                . * . . . . * .
                * . . . . . . *

(I'm using symbols instead of actual numeric values since I only want to show the symmetry of this matrix.)

Such a transformation matrix might allow you to rotate the transformed matrices by a multiple of 90 degrees in any direction, since the transformation matrix itself would always look identical if transformed at the same angles.

If indeed this is what you read about, it would mean that lossless rotation won't work for arbitrary rotation angles. The angles which guarantee no loss would depend on the matrices used during the JPEG encoding.

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Well, maybe I wasn't clear enough. What I mean by lossless is that I don't lose any additional information in the rotation. And of course that's probably only possible when rotating multiples of 90 degrees. –  onemasse Feb 13 '11 at 12:01
    
you're right about lossless rotation being possible only for angles that are a multiple of 90 degrees, but you're wrong about the IDCT step being compulsory. –  misha Feb 13 '11 at 12:09
    
@misha: That's a nice thing to know. Do you, by chance, know of a good document about the workings of JPEG? I'm always happy to learn. –  stakx Feb 13 '11 at 15:08
    
there are plenty of JPEG-specific textbooks, but I haven't read any of them. A good general image processing textbook is probably enough to explain the basics (DCT, entropy encoding, etc). After that, you can learn a lot just by playing around with libjpeg (from ijg). ijg.org –  misha Feb 13 '11 at 23:15
    
The jpeg standard is actually really easy to read, and with some help from online sources it's perfectly possible to write your own decoder. You can find it if you google "ccitt t.81". –  onemasse Feb 17 '11 at 17:27

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