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I am developing a system that allows for an image to be uploaded to a server using ASP.NET C#. I am processing the image and all is working great. I have managed to find a method that reads the Date Created EXIF data and am parsing it as a DateTime. That works great too.

I am now trying to read GPS data from the EXIF. I am wanting to capture the Latitude and Longitude figures.

I am using this list as a reference to the EXIF data (using the numbers for the property items) http://www.exiv2.org/tags.html

Here is the method to capture the date created (which works).

public DateTime GetDateTaken(Image targetImg)
{
    DateTime dtaken;

    try
    {
        //Property Item 306 corresponds to the Date Taken
        PropertyItem propItem = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(0x0132);

        //Convert date taken metadata to a DateTime object
        string sdate = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(propItem.Value).Trim();
        string secondhalf = sdate.Substring(sdate.IndexOf(" "), (sdate.Length - sdate.IndexOf(" ")));
        string firsthalf = sdate.Substring(0, 10);
        firsthalf = firsthalf.Replace(":", "-");
        sdate = firsthalf + secondhalf;
        dtaken = DateTime.Parse(sdate);
    }
    catch
    {
        dtaken = DateTime.Parse("1956-01-01 00:00:00.000");
    }
    return dtaken;
}

Below is my attempt at doing the same for GPS..

public float GetLatitude(Image targetImg)
{
    float dtaken;

    try
    {
        //Property Item 0x0002 corresponds to the Date Taken
        PropertyItem propItem = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(2);

        //Convert date taken metadata to a DateTime object
        string sdate = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(propItem.Value).Trim();
        dtaken = float.Parse(sdate);
    }
    catch
    {
        dtaken = 0;
    }
    return dtaken;
}

The value that's coming out and into sdate is "5\0\0\0\0\0\0l\t\0\0d\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0"

And that is coming from an image that was taken by an iPhone 4 which does carry the GPS EXIF data.

I know there are classes out there that do this but would prefer to write my own - I am open to suggestions though :-)

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Did you make sure that the image is geotagged by reading the image in some other software? The geotagging (embedding EXIF data) can be disabled (which is logical) in iPhone. So, are you 100% sure that the feature was enabled when the image was taken? And, if enabled, are you sure that the phone was in a location (not inside some room) when the picture was taken? The phone has to get signal from satellite. –  Sarwar Erfan Feb 13 '11 at 11:11
    
Hi Sarwar, I have just checked the image before uploading and it does contain GPS information. I viewed the property details of the file and they are there, Latitude, Longitude and Altitude. –  codemonkey Feb 13 '11 at 11:24
    
If you do decide to give up, or perhaps want to check out sample source code. MetaDataSpr served me well. –  Steven Jeuris Feb 14 '11 at 14:28
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6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

According to the link posted above by tomfanning, property item 0x0002 is the latitude expressed as a PropertyTagTypeRational. The rational type is defined as...

Specifies that the value data member is an array of pairs of unsigned long integers. Each pair represents a fraction; the first integer is the numerator and the second integer is the denominator.

You are trying to parse it as a string when it's actually just a series of bytes. According to the above, there should be 3 pairs of 32-bit unsigned integers packed into that byte array, which you can retrieve using the following:

uint degreesNumerator   = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 0);
uint degreesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 4);
uint minutesNumerator   = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 8);
uint minutesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 12);
uint secondsNumerator   = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 16);
uint secondsDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 20);

What you do with these values after you've got them is for you to work out :) Here's what the docs say:

Latitude is expressed as three rational values giving the degrees, minutes, and seconds respectively. When degrees, minutes, and seconds are expressed, the format is dd/1, mm/1, ss/1. When degrees and minutes are used and, for example, fractions of minutes are given up to two decimal places, the format is dd/1, mmmm/100, 0/1.

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Hi Jon, thanks for that info. I'm not at the computer with the source files at the moment but will be in the next few days - hopefully I can try this out and get back to you with some success! –  codemonkey Feb 15 '11 at 17:09
    
Hi Jon, i'm at the computer now and have just tried your code, it works. It converts it into numbers. I just need to figure out what to do with them now! Thanks! –  codemonkey Feb 19 '11 at 10:49
    
Just incase anyone needs it, I found a nice little class here code.google.com/p/exifbitmap/source/browse/trunk/Exif_Bitmap/… -- There is a method called GPSLatitude which someone has kindly written to work out the decimal value which I was looking for! –  codemonkey Feb 19 '11 at 11:37
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I ran across this looking for a way to get the EXIF GPS data as a set of floats. I've adapted the code from Jon Grant as follows...

public static float? GetLatitude(Image targetImg)
{
    try
    {
        //Property Item 0x0001 - PropertyTagGpsLatitudeRef
        PropertyItem propItemRef = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(1);
        //Property Item 0x0002 - PropertyTagGpsLatitude
        PropertyItem propItemLat = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(2);
        return ExifGpsToFloat(propItemRef, propItemLat);
    }
    catch (ArgumentException)
    {
        return null;
    }
}
public static float? GetLongitude(Image targetImg)
{
    try
    {
        ///Property Item 0x0003 - PropertyTagGpsLongitudeRef
        PropertyItem propItemRef = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(3);
        //Property Item 0x0004 - PropertyTagGpsLongitude
        PropertyItem propItemLong = targetImg.GetPropertyItem(4);
        return ExifGpsToFloat(propItemRef, propItemLong);
    }
    catch (ArgumentException)
    {
        return null;
    }
}
private static float ExifGpsToFloat(PropertyItem propItemRef, PropertyItem propItem)
{
    uint degreesNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 0);
    uint degreesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 4);
    float degrees = degreesNumerator / (float)degreesDenominator;

    uint minutesNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 8);
    uint minutesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 12);
    float minutes = minutesNumerator / (float)minutesDenominator;

    uint secondsNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 16);
    uint secondsDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 20);
    float seconds = secondsNumerator / (float)secondsDenominator;

    float coorditate = degrees + (minutes / 60f) + (seconds / 3600f);
    string gpsRef = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(new byte[1]  { propItemRef.Value[0] } ); //N, S, E, or W
    if (gpsRef == "S" || gpsRef == "W")
        coorditate = 0 - coorditate;
    return coorditate;
}
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other answer below suggests using doubles instead of float in the ExifGpsToFloat –  George Birbilis Mar 29 at 8:32
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You first have to read the bytes that indicate whether the EXIF data is in big endian or little endian format so you don't mess up everything.

Then you need to scan each IFD of the image looking for the GPSInfo tag (0x25 0x88), if you do NOT find this tag inside any IFD means that the image doesn't have any GPS info. If you do find this tag, read the 4 bytes of it's values, which gives you an offset to another IFD, the GPS IFD, inside this IFD you only need to retrieve the values of the following tags:

0x00 0x02 - For the latitude

0x00 0x04 - For the longitude

0x00 0x06 - For the altitude

Each of these values are unsigned rationals.

Here you can find how to do almost everything: http://www.media.mit.edu/pia/Research/deepview/exif.html

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Here is the code working, I found some errors working with float. I hope this help somebody.

  private static double ExifGpsToDouble (PropertyItem propItemRef, PropertyItem propItem)
    {
        double degreesNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 0);
        double degreesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 4);
        double degrees = degreesNumerator / (double)degreesDenominator;

        double minutesNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 8);
        double minutesDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 12);
        double minutes = minutesNumerator / (double)minutesDenominator;

        double secondsNumerator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 16);
        double secondsDenominator = BitConverter.ToUInt32(propItem.Value, 20);
        double seconds = secondsNumerator / (double)secondsDenominator;


        double coorditate = degrees + (minutes / 60d) + (seconds / 3600d);
        string gpsRef = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(new byte[1] { propItemRef.Value[0] }); //N, S, E, or W
        if (gpsRef == "S" || gpsRef == "W")
            coorditate = coorditate*-1;     
        return coorditate;
    }
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Have you tried tags 0x0013-16 per http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms534416(v=vs.85).aspx which also looks like GPS latitude?

Not sure what distinguishes these from the lower numbered tags, but worth a try.

Here are their descriptions:

0x0013 - Null-terminated character string that specifies whether the latitude of the destination point is north or south latitude. N specifies north latitude, and S specifies south latitude.

0x0014 - Latitude of the destination point. The latitude is expressed as three rational values giving the degrees, minutes, and seconds respectively. When degrees, minutes, and seconds are expressed, the format is dd/1, mm/1, ss/1. When degrees and minutes are used and, for example, fractions of minutes are given up to two decimal places, the format is dd/1, mmmm/100, 0/1.

0x0015 - Null-terminated character string that specifies whether the longitude of the destination point is east or west longitude. E specifies east longitude, and W specifies west longitude.

0x0016 - Longitude of the destination point. The longitude is expressed as three rational values giving the degrees, minutes, and seconds respectively. When degrees, minutes, and seconds are expressed, the format is ddd/1, mm/1, ss/1. When degrees and minutes are used and, for example, fractions of minutes are given up to two decimal places, the format is ddd/1, mmmm/100, 0/1.

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Hi Tom, thanks for your reply. I tried these but they didn't work (still comes out with jibberish). I might have to look at getting an EXIF class.. –  codemonkey Feb 14 '11 at 10:03
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Thanks, the code is fine but at least one failor,

uint minutes = minutesNumerator / minutesDenominator;

give not an exact result, when the minutesDenominator is not equal 1, in example in my exif=16,

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this should be a comment - once you'll have enough rep :-) –  kleopatra Feb 24 '13 at 14:27
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