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suppose that we are in business layer. There is a class called Order. Order is responsible for doings processes for a master table in sql server (Orders). This class has a method called Insert. Ok, so we have

Business logic layer:

Public Class Order
    Public Sub Insert()
        Dim obj As New DAL.Order  'order is its DataAccess class
        Try
             'we first open a Transaction
             obj.Insert()
             Dim objDetail As New OrderDetail 'OrderDetail 
             objDetail.Insert()
             'commit the transaction
        Catch(ex As Exception)
            'we rollback the transaction
        End Try
    End Sub
End Class


Public Class OrderDetail
    Public Sub Insert()
        Dim obj As New DAL.OrderDetail  'OrderDetail is its DataAccess class
        Try
             obj.Insert()
             Dim objDetail As New DAL.OrderDetail 'OrderDetail is its DataAccess class 
             objDetail.Insert()
         Catch(ex As Exception)
             Throw ex
         End Try
    End Sub
End Class

Data Access Layer:

Public Class OrderDetail
    Public Sub Insert()
        Try
             Using(Command As New SqlCommand)
                 '''code for inserting data into sql server's table
             End Using              
        Catch(ex As Exception)
            Throw ex
        End Try
    End Sub
End Class

Now, my question is: Is The execption handling above correct? What's your suggestion?

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3 Answers 3

You should handle the transaction in your dataAccess layer as close to the real transaction as possible... Also your business objects shouldn't have "insert" operations on them...

You should use your DAL to persist and retrieve your business objects. The way you did it you injected the Data access object into your business object. Perhaps this is just my opinion...

My other comment is why catch if you are just going to throw... get rid of that catch...

Personally I would wrap the actual specific "data saving error" in a generic "couldn't save data" error and return that... of course specifying the original error in the inner exception. That way if you swap of the actual data access technology and the error type changes the folks catching the error could still catch your specific custom error type and not lose the underlying error detail.

In the cases where you want to catch do something and then just let that original error bubble out... use

throw;   //and not throw ex;  

This will prevent you from losing your stack trace

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Why do you think that transaction should be started at D.A.L ? –  odiseh Feb 13 '11 at 12:36
    
If you are doing something that should be done as an all or nothing unit using your DAL then it should take care of the transaction for you... plus the DAL generally can do the transaction better... ie if you were using SQL Server as the data store you could ship the transaction responsibility into a stored proc and that would be better performing than say using something like the Distributed Transaction Coordinator OR even doing a start transaction through say ADO. The goal is separation of responsibility... Why should the business object care about transactions or how it is persisted? –  jsobo Feb 14 '11 at 0:51
1  
I would consider wrapping database exceptions in consistent types to be essential. Otherwise calling code which wants to work with multiple database types will have no alternative but to use Pokemon exception handling. –  supercat Feb 14 '11 at 23:33
    
@supercat I totally agree... and for the record I learned something new... Pokemon exception handling was something I hadn't heard of. On that note you probably will employ DTO's (data transfer objects) in doing so you find yourself copying things from one object to another... Check out AutoMapper... I absolutely love it. –  jsobo Feb 17 '11 at 1:12
    
@supercat I LOVE your Pokemon metaphor. It will stay within the walls of my heart for all eternity! +1 –  mirezus May 23 '13 at 18:04

The logic seems correct, I would just remove the try/catch in the Data Access Layer as you are not doing anything useful in the catch part other than rethrowing the exception and clearing the stack trace which could be bad. As far as the business layer is concerned it seems fine: that's exactly the place where transactions should be handled (started and committed or rolled back).

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I would get rid of all the Catch blocks.

They are rarely needed in the business/dal tiers.

Instead, just use Try/Finally or Using to ensure your database connections are released and to ensure that any transactions that are not committed get rolled back.

And let any exceptions propagate to higher levels.

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