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Is there any built in support in jQuery for basic assertion checking, primarily of things like 'expected number of returned elements'.

For instance I may have a simple statement like this :

 $("#btnSignup").click(function() {
     return validateForm();
 );

Now theres plenty of reasons why $("#btnSignup") may not return exactly 1 item :

  • You mistyped the button id name
  • Somebody renamed it by mistake
  • It doesnt exist on the page
  • There are TWO elements with that id by mistake
  • You are using ASP.NET MVC and you accidentally generated the HTML for the button with HtmlHelper.Button(...) instead of HtmlHelper.Submit(). The Button(...) method does NOT create an ID for the button element.

Now in this instance (and many instances) my application simply won't work unless EXACTLY one item is returned from the selector. So i ALWAYS want to be told if $("@#btnSignup") doesn't return exactly 1 item. So how can I do this?! I'm fine if this is an exception or preferably an alert box - so if I'm not running in a debugger then I can be told.

I'm looking for syntax somthing like this - which is similar in functionality to .NET's Single() extension method.

 $("#btnSignup").assertSingle().click(function() {
     return validateForm();
 );

 or 

 $("#btnSignup").assertSize(1).click(function() {
     return validateForm();
 );

I'd personally be fine for this code to ALWAYS run and tell whoever is there that there is a problem. its obviously not a performance issue to be running this extra code for all eternity. In this instance my code is broken if #btnSignup doesn't exist.

I'm sure this issue has been beaten to death and there are many solutions - but can somebody point me to some of them?

I dont see anything built into jQuery and would wonder what the best plugin is. I'd much rather just have something on the page that can keep 'watching' over me and tell me if theres an issue. I wouldn't even be opposed to an AJAX call being made to an error reporting service.

share|improve this question
    
Not that my life depends on it, but an up-vote/accept would be nice nevertheless. ;-) –  Tomalak Jan 31 '09 at 9:23
    
@tomalak you know i actually think i DID click on it but i think it was cos my intenet was being flaky and i was too busy testing it to notice your vote didnt go through. i was getting 7kb/s upstream and 58.34kb/s downstream on a cable modem. either case you're welcome and thanks again! –  Simon_Weaver Jan 31 '09 at 11:00
1  
Internet still flaky? ;) –  Tomalak Jul 8 '10 at 7:45
    
@tomalak - only when i lend out my verizon MiFi to a friend for the weekend who doesn't have internet, which somehow triggers my internet at home to go down all by itself –  Simon_Weaver Jul 8 '10 at 8:54
    
@Tomalak nearly 4 years now :-) !!! we need to make this into a proper plugin –  Simon_Weaver Dec 17 '12 at 5:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It doesn't look like there is anything built-in. But writing an extension isn't too hard:

$.fn.assertSize = function(size) { 
  if (this.length != size) { 
    alert("Expected " + size + " elements, but got " + this.length + ".");
    // or whatever, maybe use console.log to be more unobtrusive
  }
  return this;
};

Usage is exactly as you propose in your question.

$("#btnSignup").assertSize(1).click(function() {
  return validateForm();
);

Note that in its current form the function returns successfully even if the assertion fails. Anything you have chained will still be executed. Use return false; instead of return this; to stop further execution of the chain.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! theres pretty much infinite scope for how to log or report it but an alert will do for now! i was just hoping someone had already written a plugin. i'm really getting sick and tired of seeing javascript errors on fortune 100 companies - and i want my pages to be as error free as possible –  Simon_Weaver Jan 31 '09 at 9:17
    
oh and i've found these kinds of assertions very valuable. would like to get them into jquery itself somehow but never got round to suggesting it and inexpensive runtime checks are a good way to find refactoring bugs –  Simon_Weaver Jul 8 '10 at 8:56
2  
$.fn.assertSingle = function() { return this.assertSize(1); }; –  Peter Hilton Jun 29 '11 at 12:17

Enhancements to Tomalak’s answer: throw the error to halt execution, include the offending selector and add the assertSingle variant.

$.fn.assertSize = function(size) {
    if (this.length != size) { 
        throw "Expected " + size + " elements, but selector '" + this.selector + "' found " + this.length + ".";
    }
    return this;
};
$.fn.assertSingle = function() { return this.assertSize(1); };
share|improve this answer

I created a plugin for that: jquery-assert. You could use it like this:

Make sure, one or more elements were found, before calling the next function:

$('#element01').assertFound().val('x')

Assert that 1 element was selected:

$('#element01').assertOne(); // same as assertFound(1)

Make sure a given number of elements were found before calling further functions:

$('.item').assertFound(10).find('p').assertFound(10).data(...)
share|improve this answer

You probably want http://docs.jquery.com/Traversing/eq#index:

Reduce the set of matched elements to a single element.

If your selector returns no objects then jQuery simply won't run the chained code as it has no elements to run them on

share|improve this answer
    
this isn't quite what i'm looking for, but nonetheless was something i wasn't aware of - and might be something i would use in building such an assertion library if i do build one. i explicitly want an error and not null. big danger with jQuery is people tend not to reality check what it returns –  Simon_Weaver Jan 31 '09 at 11:03

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