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I need to run a list of methods synchronously, with the ability to stop the execution list. It's easy to stop the loop before execution using a reset event (see first line in Execute).

How can I wait for a response from action.Execute() and action.Execute() at the same time?

private ManualResetEvent _abortingToken = new ManualResetEvent(false);
private List<IAction> _actions;

public void Abort()
{
    _abortingToken.Set();
}

public void Execute()
{
    foreach (var action in _actions)
    {
        if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(0))
            break; // Execution aborted.

        action.Execute(); // Somehow, I need to call this without blocking

        while (/*Execute not finished*/)
        {
            if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(1))
                action.Abort();
        }
    }
}

I think it would be easy to preform using Tasks, but unfortunately I'm using .net 3.5.


Edit: solution inspired by SLaks answer:

public void Execute()
{
    Action execute = null;
    IAsyncResult result = null;

    foreach (var action in _actions)
    {
        execute = new Action(scriptCommand.Execute);

        if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(0))
            break; // Execution aborted.

        result = execute.BeginInvoke(null, null);

        while (!result.IsCompleted)
        {
            if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(10))
            {
                action.Abort();
                break;
            }
        }

        execute.EndInvoke(result);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's the opposite of synchronicity.
You need to run the method on a background thread.

For example, you can call the method using Delegate.BeginInvoke, then check IAsyncResult.IsCompleted. (and make sure to call EndInvoke afterwards)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Using BeginInvoke creates a very elegant code without a lot of overhead. But must I call EndInvoke? Isn't the sole purpose of EndInvoke is retrieving the return value or exceptions? What if I don't care for the result (i.e. after abort)? –  HuBeZa Feb 13 '11 at 15:33
    
@HuBeZa: If you don't call EndInvoke, you'll leak memory. –  SLaks Feb 13 '11 at 15:56

You can run Execute in another Thread, and then your while tries to Join with a timeout.

public void Execute()
{
    foreach (var action in _actions)
    {
        if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(0))
            break; // Execution aborted.

        var workThread = new Thread(action.Execute); 
        workThread.Start();

        while (!workThread.Join(100)) /Milliseconds, there is also a timespan overload
        {
            if (_abortingToken.WaitOne(1))
                action.Abort();
        }
    }
}

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.thread_methods.aspx.

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1  
The ThreadPool (used by BeginInvoke) is cheaper. –  SLaks Feb 13 '11 at 15:57

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