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I'm using Entity Framework 4 along with MSSQL to store and access data on my Windows Forms application.

Here is an example class I use to access data:

public class StudentRepository : IDisposable
{
    ColegioDBEntities db = new ColegioDBEntities();

    public IQueryable<Student> FindAllStudents()
    {
        return db.Students;
    }

    public Student FindStudent(int id)
    {
        return db.Students.SingleOrDefault(c => c.StudentId == id);
    }

    public void Add(Student Student)
    {
        db.AddToStudents(Student);
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        db.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        db.Dispose();
    }
}

And here's an example of how I use it.

    private void btnLogin_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        UserRepository repo = new UserRepository();
        var result = repo.FindAllUsers().Where(u => u.Username == txtUsername.Text && u.Password == txtPassword.Text);
        if (result.Count() > 0)
        {
            MainForm form = new MainForm(txtUsername.Text);
            form.Show();
            this.Hide();
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Usuario y/o contraseña incorrecta.",
            "Acceso Denegado",
            MessageBoxButtons.OK,
            MessageBoxIcon.Stop,
            MessageBoxDefaultButton.Button1);
            txtUsername.Focus();
            txtPassword.Focus();
        }
    }

Someone suggested that I use IDisposable to properly "clean up" the connection, but I don't know how to implement this.

Any suggestions? Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not sure if I really got the point, but you seem to implement IDisposable, but you need to call Dispose or use using:

  using(UserRepository repo = new UserRepository())
  {
    // ...
  }

This calls Dispose when leaving the using block and cleans up the UserRepository.

There is some more information:

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! That was the point. :) I forgot to include the using statement so the object is disposed of. Thanks for your time. Do you recommend I do this every time I use a Repository class? – delete Feb 13 '11 at 15:59
    
You really should ALWAYS do this when dealing with IDisposable types. You get memory leaks and probably bad side effects if you don't. – Stefan Steinegger Feb 13 '11 at 16:06
    
Yes of course, every instance of a class which can be disposed should get disposed after using it. – Enyra Feb 13 '11 at 16:06

Is it StudentRepository or UserRepository? And if one derives from the other then you have a problem.

Without inheritance your implementation of StudentRepository is acceptable. To be totally correct you should make sure by declaring it sealed:

public sealed  class StudentRepository : IDisposable
{
    ....
    public void Dispose()
    {
        db.Dispose();
    }
}

And, as @Stefan already pointed out, you have to make use of it every time you instantiate a StudentRepository, with using() { }.

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