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Let's have a bunch of tables. Tables have columns. Each column hold data of its kind. I am looking for a structure for a generic table that would allow me to access elements at given coordinates and access individual columns.

My idea was to provide a common interface that would be implemented in children. Children would use vectors to store individual columns. There are like four tables I am working with, so I could have one object for each of them.


class Data {
    template < typename T >
    virtual T getElement(unsigned int row, unsigned int column) const = 0;

    template < typename T >
    virtual void setElement(unsigned int row, unsigned int column, T value) = 0;

    template < typename T >
    virtual std::vector< T > getColumn(unsigned int column) const = 0;

    template < typename T >
    virtual void setColumn(unsigned int column, std::vector< T > values) = 0;
};

The problem is obviously in "error: templates may not be ‘virtual’". What would be the best way to attack this problem? I would like to avoid using external libraries.

Petr

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Is the table structure known at compile-time, or do you want a solution that can be used with any table, without recompiling? –  jalf Feb 13 '11 at 17:35
    
Why do the function need to be virtual? –  ronag Feb 13 '11 at 17:36
    
@ronag: because Data is indeed an interface. The functions are meant to be overridden in the derived classes. Otherwise, what's the use of abstract non-virtual functions? –  Vlad Feb 13 '11 at 17:55
    
@jalf Well, a general solution would be nice, but I know the structure of my tables. –  Petr Feb 13 '11 at 17:59
    
@Vlad: Let me rephrase my question. Why does "data" need to be an interface? I don't quite see what you are trying to do. –  ronag Feb 13 '11 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

Make the class template, like this:

template<typename T>
class Data {
    virtual T getElement(unsigned int row, unsigned int column) const = 0;

    virtual void setElement(unsigned int row, unsigned int column, T value) = 0;

    virtual std::vector< T > getColumn(unsigned int column) const = 0;

    virtual void setColumn(unsigned int column, std::vector< T > values) = 0;
};

This way you make your functions generic, simultaneously making the compiler happy as well.

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2  
This is not actually what the OP needs, as the columns data can have different types, whereas in your solution it's the same T. –  Vlad Feb 13 '11 at 17:53
    
This will compile, but I would then have to specify Data's type. I need to work with a generic Data object. –  Petr Feb 13 '11 at 17:55
    
@Petr: You tried something which is illegal in C++. End of the story. And then I gave what is legal. That is start of the story. I'm sure you would like to achieve your goal, starting from something which is possible, right? –  Nawaz Feb 13 '11 at 18:00
    
I find that often starting form what you want (whether or not it is possible in C++) is a much more productive way to work. Then I just need to figure out ways to trick the compiler into doing what I want. I find it much more useful than starting from something that is possible, but which doesn't actually solve my problem. ;) –  jalf Feb 13 '11 at 18:47
    
@jalf: But at some point of time, you've to start from what is possible, and gradually you make changes, and do tricks, to achieve your ultimate goal. Starting from what is impossible is never useful, in my opinion. –  Nawaz Feb 13 '11 at 18:50

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