Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

convert integer to its string representation in Roman Numbers in C ?

share|improve this question
9  
Unless you work for the NFL, this has to be homework, no? –  Jason Feb 13 '11 at 20:03
2  
Well, not by throwing the assignment on SO and hoping for code ;) –  delnan Feb 13 '11 at 20:03
    
@delnan: apparently works anyway :-) –  6502 Feb 13 '11 at 20:27
7  
@Jason - or some localization project is going a little over the top –  Martin Beckett Feb 13 '11 at 20:47
2  

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The easiest way is probably to set up three arrays for the complex cases and use a simple function like:

// convertToRoman:
//   In:  val: value to convert.
//        res: buffer to hold result.
//   Out: n/a
//   Cav: caller responsible for buffer size.

void convertToRoman (unsigned int val, char *res) {
    char *huns[] = {"", "C", "CC", "CCC", "CD", "D", "DC", "DCC", "DCCC", "CM"};
    char *tens[] = {"", "X", "XX", "XXX", "XL", "L", "LX", "LXX", "LXXX", "XC"};
    char *ones[] = {"", "I", "II", "III", "IV", "V", "VI", "VII", "VIII", "IX"};
    int   size[] = { 0,   1,    2,     3,    2,   1     2      3       4     2};

    //  Add 'M' until we drop below 1000.

    while (val >= 1000) {
        *res++ = 'M';
        val -= 1000;
    }

    // Add each of the correct elements, adjusting as we go.

    strcpy (res, huns[val/100]); res += size[val/100]; val = val % 100;
    strcpy (res, tens[val/10]);  res += size[val/10];  val = val % 10;
    strcpy (res, ones[val]);     res += size[val];

    // Finish string off.

    *res = '\0';
}

This will handle any unsigned integer although large numbers will have an awful lot of M characters at the front and the caller has to ensure their buffer is large enough.

Once the number has been reduced below 1000, it's a simple 3-table lookup, one each for the hundreds, tens and units. For example, take the case where val is 314.

val/100 will be 3 in that case so the huns array lookup will give CCC, then val = val % 100 gives you 14 for the tens lookup.

Then val/10 will be 1 in that case so the tens array lookup will give X, then val = val % 10 gives you 4 for the ones lookup.

Then val will be 4 in that case so the ones array lookup will give IV.

That gives you CCCXIV for 314.


A buffer-overflow-checking version is a simple step up from there:

// convertToRoman:
//   In:  val: value to convert.
//        res: buffer to hold result.
//   Out: returns 0 if not enough space, else 1.
//   Cav: n/a

int convertToRoman (unsigned int val, char *res, size_t sz) {
    char *huns[] = {"", "C", "CC", "CCC", "CD", "D", "DC", "DCC", "DCCC", "CM"};
    char *tens[] = {"", "X", "XX", "XXX", "XL", "L", "LX", "LXX", "LXXX", "XC"};
    char *ones[] = {"", "I", "II", "III", "IV", "V", "VI", "VII", "VIII", "IX"};
    int   size[] = { 0,   1,    2,     3,    2,   1     2      3       4     2};

    //  Add 'M' until we drop below 1000.

    while (val >= 1000) {
        if (sz-- < 1) return 0;
        *res++ = 'M';
        val -= 1000;
    }

    // Add each of the correct elements, adjusting as we go.

    if (sz < size[val/100]) return 0;
    sz -= size[val/100];
    strcpy (res, huns[val/100]);
    res += size[val/100];
    val = val % 100;

    if (sz < size[val/10]) return 0;
    sz -= size[val/10];
    strcpy (res, tens[val/10]);
    res += size[val/10];
    val = val % 10;

    if (sz < size[val) return 0;
    sz -= size[val];
    strcpy (res, ones[val]);
    res += size[val];

    // Finish string off.

    if (sz < 1) return 0;
    *res = '\0';
    return 1;
}

although, at that point, you could think of refactoring the processing of hundreds, tens and units into a separate function since they're so similar. I'll leave that as an extra exercise.

share|improve this answer

I think ValueConverter is one of the most elegant methods to convert an integer into a Roman numeral. I hope Dante isn't too angry about that I post his code here:

public class RomanNumeralizer : IValueConverter
{
    private static IList<RomanNumeralPair> _Pairs;


    static RomanNumeralizer()
    {
        var list = new List<RomanNumeralPair>();

        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(1000, "M"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(900, "CM"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(500, "D"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(400, "CD"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(100, "C"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(90, "XC"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(50, "L"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(40, "XL"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(10, "X"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(9, "IX"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(5, "V"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(4, "IV"));
        list.Add(new RomanNumeralPair(1, "I"));

        _Pairs = list.AsReadOnly();
    }


    private IList<RomanNumeralPair> PairSet
    {
        get
        {
            return _Pairs;
        }
    }


    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return ConvertToRomanNumeral(System.Convert.ToInt32(value));
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return null;
    }


    private string ConvertToRomanNumeral(int input)
    {
        StringBuilder myBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (RomanNumeralPair thisPair in _Pairs)
        {
            while (input >= thisPair.Value)
            {
                myBuilder.Append(thisPair.RomanValue);
                input -= thisPair.Value;
            }
        }

        return myBuilder.ToString();
    }
}

public class RomanNumeralPair
{
    private string _RomanValue;
    private int _Value;


    public RomanNumeralPair(int value, string stringValue)
    {
        this._Value = value;
        this._RomanValue = stringValue;
    }


    public string RomanValue
    {
        get
        {
            return this._RomanValue;
        }
    }

    public int Value
    {
        get
        {
            return this._Value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.