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var a = (function(y,x) {
    var x = null;
    return {
        foo: function(x){ return this.bar(x * y); },
        bar: function(x){ return x + y; }
    }
})(3,4);

Would someone please be kind enough to explain me what exactly is happening in the above code? Where can I read or refer on advanced JavaScript techniques? Sorry, I'm just starting to learn JavaScript.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What is happening is that you've created an anonymous function that takes 2 parameters x and y. The anonymous function executes immediately.

It creates a local variable x and assigns it null. This means absolutely nothing in this example. and is there to demonstrate that the parameter x overrides the locally instantiated x and can only be accessed with the this keyword.

The anonymous function then returns an object with properties foo and bar that are both functions that both take a parameter x.

What's most interesting is that the parameter y from the anonymous function becomes "locked" inside the foo and bar functions, so that when you call:

 a.foo(4);   // output 15
 a.foo(2);   // output 9

In the above example, the 4 is passed into the function foo as the x parameter. The product of 4 and 3, the original y value passed in the anonymous function, is 12. This product is passed into the bar function, where 12 is added to that same locked-in y value of 3, which gives you the sum of 15.

The same process happens for foo(2).

My suggestion is to pull up Firefox with Firebug and paste that code into the console and run it. Then call a.foo and a.bar with different values and trace the execution. This will help you better understand what is going on in the code.

Breakdown of function execution with substitution:

 a.foo(4);
 function(4) { return this.bar(4 * 3); }
 function(4) { return function(4 * 3) { return (4 * 3) + 3; } };

 function(4) { return function(12) { return (12) + 3; } };
 function(4) { return function(12) { return 15; } );

 function(4) { return 15; }
 15

I would also recommend that you check out this example of closures, but without the anonymous function. Removing the anonymous component may help make this more clear.

In fact, here is your example from above, but without anonymous functions:

function fooBar(y,x) {
    var x = null;
    return {
        foo: function(x){ return this.bar(x * y); },
        bar: function(x){ return x + y; }
    }
}

var b = fooBar(3,4);


b.foo(2);   // output 9
b.foo(4);   // output 15

So in the above example, fooBar(3,4) returns an object that contains two functions foo and bar, with the 3 locked in as the y parameter.

JavaScript Kit - Closures 101. They're Not Magic, is another great resource that will help explain the purpose of closures, as well as what it means behind the scenes.

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Can you clarify what can be accessed with the this keyword (2. paragraph)? –  Šime Vidas Feb 13 '11 at 21:18
    
@Sime - I'm going to remove that part. I'm not 100% sure of the var x = null other than the fact that it seemingly has no impact on the result of the functions, whether it be present with var, without var, or omitted altogether. –  jmort253 Feb 13 '11 at 21:21
    
thanks a lot for your answer and giving me the link to closures. –  manraj82 Feb 13 '11 at 21:34
    
@manraj82 - You're welcome! And remember, with JavaScript, you can always run the examples in your browser with Chrome Debugger or Firebug. I find the best way to grasp these sorts of things is to dig into the examples, make small changes, and break them apart into smaller components. Good luck! –  jmort253 Feb 13 '11 at 21:43

This is a closure.

An anonymous function is created then immediately executed and its return value assigned to a.

The variables passed to it are rendered (more or less) inaccessible to interference from other functions.

For some reason, the x=4 is immediately overwritten with x=null in the outer function. Then overwritten again in the arguments for each inner function. This renders it pointless to pass it in in the first place.

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+1 True. What is the point of x in the anonymous function anyways, it's set to null at the first line of the function? –  JCOC611 Feb 13 '11 at 20:55
    
@JCOC611: It seems to be conflicting with the x argument. Not sure if it's a typo or some JavaScript scoping shenanigan? –  BoltClock Feb 13 '11 at 20:55
1  
Yes, but you get the point, right? –  JCOC611 Feb 13 '11 at 21:01
1  
@jmort253: The outer function x parameter has absolutely no effect on the results - the inner functions being returned have yet another value for x - whatever they actually get called with. –  Anon. Feb 13 '11 at 21:07
2  
@jmort Creating a global variable x does not affect this example. The inner functions do not use that x variable, whether it's local to the outer function or global. –  Šime Vidas Feb 13 '11 at 21:15

See http://jibbering.com/faq/notes/closures/ -- it explains the details in a readable way.

This sort of "double binding" is required because only new function scopes introduce new execution contexts (see the above link for what that means :-) This is just how ECMAScript works -- in languages like C, Java or C#, each new block [generally speaking] introduces a new lexical variable scope.

Edit (closer inspection):

var a = (function(y,x) {
    // This is a new function body, so it introduces a new lexical scope
    // The following line is questionable. Function parameters always belong to
    // the function scope. It has the same effect a `x = null` (no var) here
    // but since it just discards the value, is still questionable...
    var x = null;
    return {
        // Both of these functions have their own function scope and
        // since they are created here they can "bind" to free variables
        // in the enclosing scope through the [[scope]] chain (implicitly).
        // Inside the x refers to the parameter passed in, respectively
        // and does NOT refer to the x above.
        foo: function(x){ return this.bar(x * y); },
        bar: function(x){ return x + y; }
    }
})(3,4);
// Then the function is executed which results in the object that contains
// foo and bar properties which contain functions that "close over" y.

And a cleaned-up version with the same semantics, to show which variables bindings are really happen

var a = (function(y,__ignored) {
    return {
        foo: function(x){ return this.bar(x * y); },
        bar: function(x){ return x + y; }
    }
})(3,4);
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I wouldn't give that link to a beginner and especially wouldn't call it readable. It gets into the inner workings of JS engines and activation objects. It's more about how closures work than how they should be used. –  mwilcox Feb 13 '11 at 21:51
    
@mwilcox I guess readable is conditional/subjective :-) It's much more readable than the specification -- but definitely not a "gentle tutorial". –  user166390 Feb 13 '11 at 21:58

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