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I am looking for a weak reference implementation similar to java.lang.ref.WeakReference, but which offers a set() method or some other way of re-reference the created weak reference object. Here is the example:

MutableWeakReference ref = new MutableWeakReference(someObject);
ref.set(anotherObject);

I need this to avoid object creation which, in my case slows down the execution time by an order of magnitude, because I am constantly changing the object to which my weak reference refers.

I tried to copy the code from JDK, but it seems impossible since java.lang.ref.Reference uses the sun.misc.Cleaner class which is internal. I also looked on Android implementation but it seems it depends on Dalvik VM for Garbage collection. I wonder if this is actually possible to implement without changing the JVM / environment.

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2  
If you're changing the reference so often, how about hanging on to it for a while and only get a new WeakReference if it ages? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 13 '11 at 22:41
4  
If the referent of a WeakReference were mutable, there might be a race condition where you mutate the Reference after it's been placed on a ReferenceQueue. I don't think this is the way to go. –  Ron Feb 14 '11 at 5:34
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Wouldn't it just be possible to encapsulate your references in a simple

class MyOwnReference<T> {
    public T ref;
    public void set(T o) { ref = o; }
}

and create WeakReference<MyOwnReference<WhatEver>>?

I wonder if this is actually possible to implement without changing the JVM / environment.

No, you probably can't "reimplement" the WeakReference. It is a JVM-supported class.

Are you sure it is the creation of WeakReference instances that slows it down? I wouldn't think doing

ref = new WeakReference(someObject);

instead of some

ref.set(anotherObject);

would be that much more expensive.

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I am actually implementing an iterator of some kind. Whenever I advance to the next entry, I need to create a new WeakReference. I have run some tests and it seems this is like 8-10 times slower. –  leden Feb 13 '11 at 22:05
    
I don't think this solution could help. I've just run a simple benchmark comparing creating strong and weak references. The result was strongly in favor of the weak references. It's strange but reproducible and most probably caused by the GC overhead and the huge overhead because of the non-reclaimable memory taken by the strong references. –  maaartinus Feb 13 '11 at 22:49
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You can't program a weak reference yourself. It's a "special" class that JVM handles specially.

Just use a new weak reference

class MutableWeakReference<T> 

    WeakReference<T> wr;

    void set(T obj)
        wr = new WeakReference(obj);  
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I am actually implementing an iterator of some kind. Whenever I advance to the next entry, I need to create a new WeakReference.

I'm puzzled why you would need to use a WeakReference at all in an iterator. The normal use-case for WeakReference is for long term references to objects. But an iterator is typically a short term object, and an iteration is typically a short term process. The fact that it / they use an ordinary (strong) reference to the target object in the short term shouldn't be a concern.

I have run some tests and it seems this is like 8-10 times slower.

Again, this suggests that you shouldn't be using a WeakReference at all.

Is there a particular reason why won't a regular reference work for you?

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I wanted to implement a non-fail fast iterator which becomes invalid as soon the entry it is referencing is deleted. WeakReference provides a partial safety of not able to "dereference" deleted iterator if that entry is deleted (the safety is only partial since there is no guarantee that object will be deleted immediately). –  leden Feb 14 '11 at 17:55
    
You can be nearly sure, it won't be deleted immediately. Moreover, it can be referenced from other places and not deleted at all. I don't see what advantages should such an iterator offer. Fail-fast is good sometimes, non-failing (e.g., reflecting some old state of the collection) is good sometimes, with your version I really don't know. –  maaartinus Feb 15 '11 at 5:10
    
@leden - I can think of better (less expensive, more reliable) ways of implementing that ... depending on what exactly it is you are iterating over. If you gave more details of the data structure you are iterating I could be more specific. –  Stephen C Feb 15 '11 at 5:43
    
The thing I am iterating over is closest to a linked list. The best way I have come up so far is to have an extra boolean entry for each entry. So iterators can check whether the entry is deleted or not. This is a slight memory overhead, which would be there if those mutable weak references existed. Do you have a better alternative? –  leden Feb 15 '11 at 10:16
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