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I recently had to type in a small C test program and, in the process, I made a spelling mistake in the main function by accidentally using vooid instead of void.

And yet it still worked.

Reducing it down to its smallest complete version, I ended up with:

int main (vooid) {
    return 42;
}

This does indeed compile (gcc -Wall -o myprog myprog.c) and, when run, it returns 42.

How exactly is this valid code?


Here's a transcript cut and pasted from my bash shell to show what I'm doing:

pax$ cat qq.c
int main (vooid) {
    return 42;
}

pax$ rm qq ; gcc -Wall -o qq qq.c ; ./qq

pax$ echo $?
42
share|improve this question
    
By defining main with a single int parameter, you invoke Undefined Behaviour. Anything can happen :) –  pmg Feb 13 '11 at 23:40
6  
Actually, I'm not sure about the UB, @pmg. ISO specifically allows for other possibilities of main from the standard two canonical ones. For portability, you should use one of those two but I don't think UB applies here. –  paxdiablo Feb 14 '11 at 0:50
    
Hmm: in a hosted environment main must have one of the 2 canonical forms (2.1.2.2). But you're right @pax, in a free-standing environment, the identifier main is in no way special: if used as a function it can be of any type and have any number of parameters of any type. –  pmg Feb 14 '11 at 19:08
2  
In C99, freestanding is totally implementation defined. For hosted, section 5.1.2.2.1 states at the end "or in some other implementation-defined manner" so it requires, at a minimum, the two canonical forms but can have others as well (this would allow the UNIXy int main (int argc, char *argv[], char *envp[]); to be conforming). –  paxdiablo Feb 14 '11 at 23:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 175 down vote accepted

It's simply using the "old-style" function-declaration syntax; you're implicitly declaring an int parameter called vooid.

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2  
This seems to be the case. If you add "vooid=42; return vooid;" to main, you also get a return value of 42. –  Jeff Ames Feb 13 '11 at 22:46
32  
Aargghh, you're right. If I add -std=c99, I get qq.c:1: warning: type of 'vooid' defaults to 'int'. –  paxdiablo Feb 13 '11 at 22:48
    
Excellent catch! I'm out of votes for today but this definitely deserves a +1. –  templatetypedef Feb 13 '11 at 22:54
6  
Coincidentally, this answer's got 42 upvotes while I'm reading it, ;D. –  fwielstra Feb 18 '11 at 21:16
    
Wow this is really going back... –  Jay May 16 '12 at 13:01

It's valid code, because myprog.c contains:

int main (vooid) // vooid is of type int, allowed, and an alias for argc
{     
  return 42; // The answer to the Ultimate Question
} 

vooid contains one plus the number of arguments passed (i.e., argc). So, in effect all you've done is to rename argc to vooid.

share|improve this answer
7  
If you do "return vooid;" instead, it does indeed give 1 + num. of args. –  Jeff Ames Feb 13 '11 at 22:48
4  
@Jeff, the name of the program is counted as an arguement, hence the+1 –  Martin Beckett Feb 14 '11 at 2:21

In C, the default type for a function argument is int. So, your program is treating the word vooid as int main(int vooid), which is perfectly valid code.

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It is only gcc -std=c89 -Wall -o qq qq.c and gcc -std=gnu89 -Wall -o qq qq.c don't emit a warning. All the other standards emit a warning about implicit type int for vooid.

int main(chart) behaves the same way as does int main (vooid).

return vooid; returns the number of command line arguments.

I tested with gcc 4.4.5 on Debian testing system.

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Your compiler is using "old-style" function-declaration syntax; So when you're passing vooid as parameter in main it will not complaining it treats it as variable of type int

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2  
There are already 4 answers which explain this. Why add another one? –  Alex D Sep 17 '12 at 12:09
    
i wrote this to check whether i am correct or not in my explanantion –  Anshul garg Sep 17 '12 at 12:12
8  
Answers aren't the place to double-check if you're right or wrong. If you don't know, aren't sure, or aren't confident, you really shouldn't be posting an answer. Especially one that's almost a copy 'n' paste of the top answer. –  Cornstalks Jan 19 '13 at 2:12

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