Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a mentorship program for our church in rails (im still farily new to rails)..

And i need to model this..

contact
has_one :father, :class_name => "Contact"
has_one :mother, :class_name => "Contact"
has_many :children, :class_name => "Contact"
has_many :siblings, :through <Mother and Father>, :source => :children

So basically an objects "siblings" needs to map all the children from both the father and mother not including the object itself..

Is this possible?

Thanks

Daniel

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's funny how questions that appear simple can have complex answers. In this case, implementing the reflexive parent/child relationship is fairly simple, but adding the father/mother and siblings relationships creates a few twists.

To start, we create tables to hold the parent-child relationships. Relationship has two foreign keys, both pointing at Contact:

create_table :contacts do |t|
  t.string :name
end

create_table :relationships do |t|
  t.integer :contact_id
  t.integer :relation_id
  t.string :relation_type
end

In the Relationship model we point the father and mother back to Contact:

class Relationship < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :contact
  belongs_to :father, :foreign_key => :relation_id, :class_name => "Contact",
  :conditions => { :relationships => { :relation_type => 'father'}}
  belongs_to :mother, :foreign_key => :relation_id, :class_name => "Contact",
  :conditions => { :relationships => { :relation_type => 'mother'}}
end

and define the inverse associations in Contact:

class Contact < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :relationships, :dependent => :destroy
  has_one :father, :through => :relationships
  has_one :mother, :through => :relationships
end

Now a relationship can be created:

@bart = Contact.create(:name=>"Bart")
@homer = Contact.create(:name=>"Homer")
@bart.relationships.build(:relation_type=>"father",:father=>@homer)
@bart.save!
@bart.father.should == @homer

This is not so great, what we really want is to build the relationship in a single call:

class Contact < ActiveRecord::Base
  def build_father(father)
    relationships.build(:father=>father,:relation_type=>'father')
  end
end

so we can do:

@bart.build_father(@homer)
@bart.save!

To find the children of a Contact, add a scope to Contact and (for convenience) an instance method:

scope :children, lambda { |contact| joins(:relationships).\
  where(:relationships => { :relation_type => ['father','mother']}) }

def children
  self.class.children(self)
end

Contact.children(@homer) # => [Contact name: "Bart")]
@homer.children # => [Contact name: "Bart")]

Siblings are the tricky part. We can leverage the Contact.children method and manipulate the results:

def siblings
  ((self.father ? self.father.children : []) +
   (self.mother ? self.mother.children : [])
   ).uniq - [self]
end

This is non-optimal, since father.children and mother.children will overlap (thus the need for uniq), and could be done more efficiently by working out the necessary SQL (left as an exercise :)), but keeping in mind that self.father.children and self.mother.children won't overlap in the case of half-siblings (same father, different mother), and a Contact might not have a father or a mother.

Here are the complete models and some specs:

# app/models/contact.rb
class Contact < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :relationships, :dependent => :destroy
  has_one :father, :through => :relationships
  has_one :mother, :through => :relationships

  scope :children, lambda { |contact| joins(:relationships).\
    where(:relationships => { :relation_type => ['father','mother']}) }

  def build_father(father)
    # TODO figure out how to get ActiveRecord to create this method for us
    # TODO failing that, figure out how to build father without passing in relation_type
    relationships.build(:father=>father,:relation_type=>'father')
  end

  def build_mother(mother)
    relationships.build(:mother=>mother,:relation_type=>'mother')
  end

  def children
    self.class.children(self)
  end

  def siblings
    ((self.father ? self.father.children : []) +
     (self.mother ? self.mother.children : [])
     ).uniq - [self]
  end
end

# app/models/relationship.rb
class Relationship < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :contact
  belongs_to :father, :foreign_key => :relation_id, :class_name => "Contact",
  :conditions => { :relationships => { :relation_type => 'father'}}
  belongs_to :mother, :foreign_key => :relation_id, :class_name => "Contact",
  :conditions => { :relationships => { :relation_type => 'mother'}}
end

# spec/models/contact.rb
require 'spec_helper'

describe Contact do
  before(:each) do
    @bart = Contact.create(:name=>"Bart")
    @homer = Contact.create(:name=>"Homer")
    @marge = Contact.create(:name=>"Marge")
    @lisa = Contact.create(:name=>"Lisa")
  end

  it "has a father" do
    @bart.relationships.build(:relation_type=>"father",:father=>@homer)
    @bart.save!
    @bart.father.should == @homer
    @bart.mother.should be_nil
  end

  it "can build_father" do
    @bart.build_father(@homer)
    @bart.save!
    @bart.father.should == @homer
  end

  it "has a mother" do
    @bart.relationships.build(:relation_type=>"mother",:father=>@marge)
    @bart.save!
    @bart.mother.should == @marge
    @bart.father.should be_nil
  end

  it "can build_mother" do
    @bart.build_mother(@marge)
    @bart.save!
    @bart.mother.should == @marge
  end

  it "has children" do
    @bart.build_father(@homer)
    @bart.build_mother(@marge)
    @bart.save!
    Contact.children(@homer).should include(@bart)
    Contact.children(@marge).should include(@bart)
    @homer.children.should include(@bart)
    @marge.children.should include(@bart)
  end

  it "has siblings" do
    @bart.build_father(@homer)
    @bart.build_mother(@marge)
    @bart.save!
    @lisa.build_father(@homer)
    @lisa.build_mother(@marge)
    @lisa.save!
    @bart.siblings.should == [@lisa]
    @lisa.siblings.should == [@bart]
    @bart.siblings.should_not include(@bart)
    @lisa.siblings.should_not include(@lisa)
  end

  it "doesn't choke on nil father/mother" do
    @bart.siblings.should be_empty
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
You sir are a rails and stackoverflow monster (Specs in your answers!?) awesome!! if i could i'd kiss you! Thanks :) –  Daniel Upton Feb 14 '11 at 13:10
    
Ah.. one idea though, would it not work to add father_id and mother_id to the contact model and then add has_many :children, :class_name => "Contact", :finder_sql => 'SELECT * FROM contacts WHERE contacts.father_id = #{id} OR contacts.mother_id = #{id}" and has_many :siblings, :class_name => "Contact", :finder_sql => 'SELECT * FROM contacts WHERE contacts.father_id = #{father_id} OR contacts.mother_id = #{mother_id}' ? Just an idea :P –  Daniel Upton Feb 14 '11 at 13:54
    
You could do it in one table, but that would limit you to the relationships that can be specified through the foreign keys. With a separate table you have the flexibility to specify other relationship types, like 'godfather' or 'uncle'. –  zetetic Feb 14 '11 at 17:31
    
Cool thanks :) i think i'm gonna hack together a combination of the 2 over lunch.. and add 3 foreign keys to the model father_figure_id mother_figure_id and emergency_contact_id and use those for the father and mother style stuff.. and then add in a many to many style thing for other contact relationships like uncles cousins and freinds... Thanks for the great advise! Oh one last thing.. How does the has_one :father, :through => :relationships work if relationships are many to many? Thanks! :D –  Daniel Upton Feb 15 '11 at 9:55
    
The schema is the same for has_one and has_many: a table relating to a second table which has a foreign key pointing at the first. Or in the case of :through, storing the keys in join table. has_one is basically a special case of has_many which won't add more than one object through the association. Of course this assumes you use the methods added by has_one to build the objects -- nothing prevents you from adding multiple fathers by using SQL, unless you add constraints to the database. –  zetetic Feb 15 '11 at 17:19

I totally agree with zetetic. The question looks far more simpler then the answer and there is little we could do about it. I'll add my 20c though.
Tables:

    create_table :contacts do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.string :gender
    end
    create_table :relations, :id => false do |t|
      t.integer :parent_id
      t.integer :child_id
    end

Table relations does not have corresponding model.

class Contact < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :parents,
    :class_name => 'Contact',
    :join_table => 'relations',
    :foreign_key => 'child_id',
    :association_foreign_key => 'parent_id'

  has_and_belongs_to_many :children,
    :class_name => 'Contact',
    :join_table => 'relations',
    :foreign_key => 'parent_id',
    :association_foreign_key => 'child_id'

  def siblings
    result = self.parents.reduce [] {|children, p| children.concat  p.children}
    result.uniq.reject {|c| c == self}
  end

  def father
    parents.where(:gender => 'm').first
  end

  def mother
    parents.where(:gender => 'f').first
  end
end  

Now we have regular Rails assosiations. So we can

alice.parents << bob
alice.save

bob.chidren << cindy
bob.save

alice.parents.create(Contact.create(:name => 'Teresa', :gender => 'f')

and all stuff like that.

share|improve this answer
  has_and_belongs_to_many :parents,
    :class_name => 'Contact',
    :join_table => 'relations',
    :foreign_key => 'child_id',
    :association_foreign_key => 'parent_id',
    :delete_sql = 'DELETE FROM relations WHERE child_id = #{id}'

  has_and_belongs_to_many :children,
    :class_name => 'Contact',
    :join_table => 'relations',
    :foreign_key => 'parent_id',
    :association_foreign_key => 'child_id',
    :delete_sql = 'DELETE FROM relations WHERE parent_id = #{id}'

I used this example but had to add the :delete_sql to clean up the relations records. At first I used double quotes around the string but found that caused errors. Switching to single quotes worked.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.