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I'm trying to write some JUnit tests for a Java method that takes a base URL and target URL and returns the target URL relative to the given base URL.

I'm using the category based partition to make my test set. Currently i'm testing to check the following:

  • check the two input URL's have the same protocol and host;
  • check for when the paths aren't the same and that the relative URL adjusts correctly;
  • check for when the base URL is longer than the target URL;
  • check for when the target URL is longer than the base URL;
  • check for when the base URL and target URL are identical;

I was wondering how other people would test this method using JUnit? Am i missing any criteria?

 /**
 * This method converts an absolute url to an url relative to a given base-url.
 * The algorithm is somewhat chaotic, but it works (Maybe rewrite it). 
 * Be careful, the method is ".mm"-specific. Something like this should be included
 * in the librarys, but I couldn't find it. You can create a new absolute url with
 * "new URL(URL context, URL relative)".
 */
public static String toRelativeURL(URL base, URL target) {
        // Precondition: If URL is a path to folder, then it must end with '/' character. 
    if( (base.getProtocol().equals(target.getProtocol())) &&
        (base.getHost().equals(target.getHost()))) {

        String baseString = base.getFile();
        String targetString = target.getFile();
        String result = "";

        //remove filename from URL
        baseString = baseString.substring(0, baseString.lastIndexOf("/")+1);

        //remove filename from URL
        targetString = targetString.substring(0, targetString.lastIndexOf("/")+1);

        StringTokenizer baseTokens = new StringTokenizer(baseString,"/");//Maybe this causes problems under windows
        StringTokenizer targetTokens = new StringTokenizer(targetString,"/");//Maybe this causes problems under windows
        String nextBaseToken = "", nextTargetToken = "";

        //Algorithm

        while(baseTokens.hasMoreTokens() && targetTokens.hasMoreTokens()) {
        nextBaseToken = baseTokens.nextToken();
        nextTargetToken = targetTokens.nextToken();
        System.out.println("while1");
        if (!(nextBaseToken.equals(nextTargetToken))) {
            System.out.println("if1");
            while(true) {
            result = result.concat("../");
            System.out.println(result);
            if (!baseTokens.hasMoreTokens()) {
                System.out.println("break1");
                break;
            }
            System.out.println("break2");
            nextBaseToken = baseTokens.nextToken();
            }
            while(true) {
            result = result.concat(nextTargetToken+"/");
            System.out.println(result);
            if (!targetTokens.hasMoreTokens()) {
                System.out.println("break3");
                break;
            }
            System.out.println("break4");
            nextTargetToken = targetTokens.nextToken();
            }
            String temp = target.getFile();
            result = result.concat(temp.substring(temp.lastIndexOf("/")+1,temp.length()));
            System.out.println("1");
            return result;
        }
        }

        while(baseTokens.hasMoreTokens()) {
        result = result.concat("../");
        baseTokens.nextToken();
        }

        while(targetTokens.hasMoreTokens()) {
        nextTargetToken = targetTokens.nextToken();
        result = result.concat(nextTargetToken + "/");
        }

        String temp = target.getFile();
        result = result.concat(temp.substring(temp.lastIndexOf("/")+1,temp.length()));
        System.out.println("2");
        return result;
    }
    System.out.println("3");
    return target.toString();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Something to try out.. now that you know how to do it. Try scrapping the method and writing the method again using TDD - This way you won't have code that is not already covered by a unit test.. also you may come up with a better design this time (because you're doing it for the second time). –  Gishu Feb 14 '11 at 2:35
    
I think something went wrong with your edit there, ;). –  fwielstra Feb 14 '11 at 11:31
    
I rolled back your question .. it looks like you have some kind of browser extension gone wild. –  Tim Post Mar 23 '11 at 16:32
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1 Answer 1

Just a few thoughts...

  1. You might want to test if either (or both) your URL input is null. :)
  2. If the target URL has parameters (ex: http://host/app/bla?param1=value&param2=value), does the generated relative URL contain the parameters?
  3. If the target URL is just http://host, will it cause IndexOutOfBoundException on targetString.lastIndexOf("/")... the same applies to base URL.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply: 1. But Java won't even let me create a URL that is null? 2. The URL will contain the parameters (simply due to how the method works; it just appends the file part of the URL at the end) 3. It won't cause any error. Should it? –  Chris Brown Feb 14 '11 at 1:44
    
Any variable that of a nonprimitive type can be null. You could of course write the program in such a way that it doesn't happen, but you may as well add it as a unit test just to be safe. –  MatrixFrog Feb 14 '11 at 2:30
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