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I'm designing a music player app for Android that will feature pop-up controls. I'm currently trying to get these controls to close after a certain period of inactivity but there doesn't seem to be a clearly documented method of doing this. So far I have managed to cobble the following solution together using a few suggestions both from this site and others.

private Timer originalTimer = new Timer();

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState){
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.playcontrols);

    View exitButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_exit_pane);
    exitButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View volUpButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_vol_up);
    volUpButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View playButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_play);
    playButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View volDownButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_vol_down);
    volDownButton.setOnClickListener(this);

    musicPlayback();

    originalTimer.schedule(closeWindow, 5*1000);    //Closes activity after 10 seconds of inactivity

}

And the code that should close the window

//Closes activity after 10 seconds of inactivity
public void onUserInteraction(){
    closeWindow.cancel();   //not sure if this is required?
    originalTimer.cancel();
    originalTimer.schedule(closeWindow, 5*1000);
}

private TimerTask closeWindow = new TimerTask() {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        finish();
    }
};

The above code makes perfect sense to me but it force closes upon any user interaction. It does however close normally if untouched and won't close after interaction if I remove the second schedule, so this seems to be the problem. Also note that I imagine I will be moving this timing task to another thread to help keep the UI snappy. I need to get it working first though :D. If there's any more info I need to supply please ask and thanks for any help...Ye guys are brilliant!

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Use adb logcat, DDMS, or the DDMS perspective in Eclipse to examine LogCat and look at the stack trace associated with your "force close". –  CommonsWare Feb 14 '11 at 2:04
1  
Rather than Timer and TimerTask, I would recommend using a Handler and postDelayed() to schedule a Runnable to be invoked after your period of delay. If there is user interaction, you can use removeCallbacks() to unschedule the Runnable and use postDelayed() to schedule it again. The advantage is that this will give you control on the main application thread, whereas TimerTask is on a background thread, and that is probably the source of your crash. –  CommonsWare Feb 14 '11 at 2:06
    
Still getting use to this...never used logcat before...give me this following output: E/AndroidRuntime( 3835): FATAL EXCEPTION: main E/AndroidRuntime( 3835): java.lang.IllegalStateException: Timer was cancelled E/AndroidRuntime( 3835): at java.util.Timer.scheduleImpl(Timer.java:566) E/AndroidRuntime( 3835): at java.util.Timer.schedule(Timer.java:463) E/AndroidRuntime( 3835): at org.stephenfin.zoomplayer.PlayerControls.onUs erInteraction(PlayerControls.java:69) –  stephenfin Feb 14 '11 at 2:24
    
So...what's on line 69 of your PlayerControls class? –  user432209 Feb 14 '11 at 2:41
    
It was the timer cancel() call. Not sure why but it wasn't happy about being cancelled. The handler worked as expected however and is apparently a better solution –  stephenfin Feb 14 '11 at 3:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Based on @CommonsWare's suggestion, switched to a Handler. Works perfectly. Thanks very much!

private final int delayTime = 3000;
private Handler myHandler = new Handler();

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState){
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.playcontrols);

    View exitButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_exit_pane);
    exitButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View volUpButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_vol_up);
    volUpButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View playButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_play);
    playButton.setOnClickListener(this);
    View volDownButton = findViewById(R.id.controls_vol_down);
    volDownButton.setOnClickListener(this);

    musicPlayback();

    myHandler.postDelayed(closeControls, delayTime);

}

and the other methods...

//Closes activity after 10 seconds of inactivity
public void onUserInteraction(){
    myHandler.removeCallbacks(closeControls);
    myHandler.postDelayed(closeControls, delayTime);
}

private Runnable closeControls = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        finish();
        overridePendingTransition(R.anim.fadein, R.anim.fadeout);
    }
};
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To complete the answer above, note that the Activity.onUserInteraction() is adequate only if you care about clicks.

The documentation at http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Activity.html#onUserInteraction%28%29 states: "Note that this callback will be invoked for the touch down action that begins a touch gesture, but may not be invoked for the touch-moved and touch-up actions that follow."

Actual implementation proved it indeed ignores all movements on the tablet, which means the clock is never reset while, say, drawing without releasing the finger. On the other hand, it also means that the clock is not reset too often, which limits the overhead.

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