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If I have a function which accepts more than one string parameter, the first parameter seems to get all the data assigned to it, and remaining parameters are passed in as empty.

A quick test script:

Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test("ABC", "DEF")

The output generated is

$arg1 value: ABC DEF
$arg2 value: 

The correct output should be:

$arg1 value: ABC
$arg2 value: DEF

This seems to be consistent between v1 and v2 on multiple machines, so obviously, I'm doing something wrong. Can anyone point out exactly what?

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8 Answers

up vote 113 down vote accepted

Parameters in calls to functions in PowerShell (all versions) are space-separated, not comma separated. Also, the parentheses are entirely unneccessary and will cause a parse error in powershell 2.0 (or later) if Set-StrictMode is active. Parenthesised arguments are used in .NET methods only.

function foo($a, $b, $c) {
   "a: $a; b: $b; c: $c"
}

ps> foo 1 2 3
a: 1; b: 2; c: 3
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1  
I knew it was me :-) Thanks. –  Nasir Feb 14 '11 at 2:08
1  
Most important thing that has finally helped 'stick' this in my mind is the last sentence: "Parenthesised arguments are used in .NET Methods only." –  Ashley Steel Dec 12 '13 at 17:25
    
I prefer using the paranthesis and comma separated.. is it possible to do this in powershell? –  sam yi Mar 19 at 4:27
    
@samyi No. Passing a (1,2,3) to a function is effectively treated as an array; a single argument. If you want to use OO method style arguments, use modules: $m = new-module -ascustomobject { function Add($x,$y) { $x + $y } }; $m.Add(1,1) –  x0n Mar 19 at 13:18
    
@x0n, thanks. just what i was looking for. –  sam yi Mar 19 at 15:19
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You call powershell functions w/o the parameters and comma as a separator. Try using:

   test "ABC" "DEF"

In Powershell the comma (,) is an array operator e.g.

   $a = "one", "two", "three"

Sets $a to an array with three values.

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thanks for the quick reply. –  Nasir Feb 14 '11 at 2:09
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The correct answer has already been provided but this issue seems prevalent enough to warrant some additional details for those wanting to understand the subtleties. I would have added this just as a comment but I wanted to include an illustration--I tore this off my quick reference chart on PowerShell functions. This assumes function f's signature is f($a, $b, $c):

syntax pitfalls of a function call

Thus, one can call a function with space-separated positional parameters or order-independent named parameters. The other pitfalls reveal that you need to be cognizant of commas, parentheses, and white space.

For further reading see my article Down the Rabbit Hole: A Study in PowerShell Pipelines, Functions, and Parameters just published on Simple-Talk.com. The article contains a link to the quick reference/wall chart as well.

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The explanation with the more verbose syntax calling each parameter and assigning it a value really cemented it in. Thanks! –  hobs Dec 15 '13 at 0:28
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If you try:

PS > Test("ABC", "GHI") ("DEF")

you get:

$arg1 value: ABC GHI
$arg2 value: DEF

so you see that the parentesis separates the parameters

If you try:

PS > $var = "C"
PS > Test ("AB" + $var) "DEF"

you get:

$arg1 value: ABC
$arg2 value: DEF

Now you could find some immediate usefullness of the parentesis - a space will not become a separator for the next parameter - instead you have an eval function.

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Parens don't separate parameters. They define array. –  n0rd Oct 12 '13 at 19:16
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I don't know what you're doing with the function, but have a look at using the 'param' keyword. It's quite a bit more powerful for passing parameters into a function, and makes it more user friendly. Below is a link to an overly complex article from Microsoft about it. It isn't as complicated as the article makes it sound. Param Usage

Also, here is an example from a thread on this site:

Check it out.

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Thanks for the answer. However, I was having issues when calling the function. Didn't matter if the function was declared with param or without it. –  Nasir Feb 16 '11 at 14:08
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Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test "ABC" "DEF"
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I states the following earlier:

The common problem is using the singular form $arg, which is incorrect.
It should always be plural as $args.

The problem is not that.
In fact, $arg can be anything else. The problem was the use of the comma and the parantheses.
I run the following code that worked and the output follows:

Code:

Function Test([string]$var1, [string]$var2)
{
    Write-Host "`$var1 value: $var1"
    Write-Host "`$var2 value: $var2"
}

Test "ABC" "DEF"

Output:

$var1 value: ABC $var2 value: DEF

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1  
Thank you my friend, however, you're a couple of years late :-) The top three answers here had sufficiently addressed the issue. May I suggest heading over to Unanswered section and trying some of those questions? –  Nasir Nov 8 '13 at 13:49
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Function Test([string]$arg1, [string]$arg2)
{
    Write-Host "`$arg1 value: $arg1"
    Write-Host "`$arg2 value: $arg2"
}

Test("ABC") ("DEF")
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The the result will come out as it should: –  user3222697 Jan 22 at 8:52
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