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I have rendered a very rough model of a molecule that consists of 7 helices and would like to ask if there is anyway possible to allow the helices themselves to tilt (rotate) in certain ways so as to interact with one another. For clarity, I insert an image of my program output (although for an orthographic projection, so it appears as the projection of a 3D helix onto a 2D plane).

enter image description here

I have included the code for rending a single helix (all others are the same).

Would it be useful to store the geometry of my objects in vertex arrays instead of rendering them each time separately for the 7 different colors? (Each helix consists of 36,000 vertices and I am concerned that the arrays might get large enough to cause serious performance issues?)

I understand the matrix stack is the data structure for performing multiple consecutive individual transformations on particular objects, but I not sure how exactly to specify so that an entire one of my helices can tilt? (glRotatef does not actually tilt the helices for some reason)

/*HELIX RENDERING*/

glLoadIdentity();
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glPushMatrix();
glTranslatef(0.0, 100.0, -5.0);  //Move Position
glRotatef(90.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0);
glBegin(GL_LINE_STRIP);

for(theta = 0.0; theta <= 360.0; theta += 0.01) {   
    x = r*(cosf(theta));
    y = r*(sinf(theta));
    z = c*theta;
    glVertex3f(x,y,z);
    glColor3f(1.0, 1.0, 0.0);           
}

glEnd();
glPopMatrix(); 
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You might be (very) interested by glDisplayList : songho.ca/opengl/gl_displaylist.html –  POSIX_ME_HARDER Feb 14 '11 at 2:19
    
Also, glRotatef(90.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0); is rotating x,y,z by 0.0*90 ;) try glRotatef(90.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0); to rotate x by 90 –  POSIX_ME_HARDER Feb 14 '11 at 2:28
    
@Williwaw Thanks for the advice, glRotate(90.0f,1.0f,1.0f,0.0) seems to be roughly the type of affine transformation I was aiming for. I considered using a display list in my program but for rendering only seven helices it seems somewhat unnecessary to burden the memory since the graphics card will take care of most rendering commands. –  Spyros Feb 14 '11 at 11:45
    
I would use VBO with vertex position and a simple uniform for color. –  kvark Feb 14 '11 at 13:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Would it be useful to store the geometry of my objects in vertex arrays instead of rendering them each time separately for the 7 different colors? (Each helix consists of 36,000 vertices and I am concerned that the arrays might get large enough to cause serious performance issues?

Drawing geometry using vertex arrays always makes sense. And in your case, the overhead caused by those 36k * (5 floating pointer operations + 2 function calls) will seriously affect your performance. Using vertex arrays will give you a 100× performance gain easily, just because you're not recreating the data each and every call.

You may also be interested in not using lines, since you can't shade those in any useful way. I'd render those helices by creating basic building blocks, created from ellipses extruded along the helical. One basic block for the intra helix and two caps. The chirality is easily changed by mirroring along one axis. With modern OpenGL implementations you can implement instancing on the intra-helix-element to further increase performance.

If you want to flex the helix, I'd do this using skeletal skinning.

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thanks for the information! I changed my primitives from GL_LINES to GL_POINTS and the image that is rendered is slightly better. The accuracy in depicting the helices is not as important as getting them to do interesting things (interactively) and I think the way to make them look 3D is using lighting patterns. –  Spyros Feb 18 '11 at 17:41
    
The problem is, that lighting doesn't work well on lines and not at all on points, because those have no normal vector. Lines have tangents, which can be used in tangent lighting, but for that you need a shader. –  datenwolf Feb 18 '11 at 17:53

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