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May I know what's wrong with my statement? I receive a syntax error. Been trying to find out what's wrong all day. :(

cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO LogIn(Username,Password) VALUES('" + AddUsernameTextBox.Text + "','" + AddPasswordTextBox.Text + "')";
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4  
FYI, your allowing this code to permit SQL injection!!! –  Daniel A. White Feb 13 '11 at 22:08
4  
Print out the string after you build it and see if it's what you expected. –  Dan Grossman Feb 13 '11 at 22:10
2  
@pacheco, why are you trying something bad? You see the problem is not only hackers and SQL injection. It's also users entering quotes in some fields without knowing and making your system crash. So why not do things the way they are supposed to be? –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 13 '11 at 22:10
1  
Does your username or password contain a single quote? –  Pwninstein Feb 14 '11 at 4:21
4  
You should look at parameterized queries... see csharp-station.com/Tutorials/AdoDotNet/Lesson06.aspx –  jsobo Feb 14 '11 at 4:30

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted
cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO LogIn([Username],[Password]) VALUES('" + AddUsernameTextBox.Text + "','" + AddPasswordTextBox.Text + "')";

This code will help if the error is due to reserved keywords :- username and password. Please quote the error if this is not the case .

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thanks man that worked like a charm! –  pacheco Feb 14 '11 at 5:05
2  
Think about what would happen if you use this code and I enter the password '); DROP TABLE LogIn;--? Parametrized queries are your friend. –  Greg Feb 14 '11 at 5:25
3  
You don't have to get hostile to have problems here, just Irish. What happens with the account for Mr. O'Neill? –  Loren Pechtel Feb 14 '11 at 5:42
    
@Greg: probably not much--Access doesn't allow multiple SQL statements to run together. Still not a good idea, since it would be horrible to upgrade to a DBMS that does without fixing it. –  RolandTumble Feb 14 '11 at 19:27
    
@RolandTumble - I didn't know that about Access, thanks. In fact I didn't even notice it was Access; my "Danger!" siren had already gone off. –  Greg Feb 14 '11 at 20:36
  command.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Login([Username],[Password]) VALUES(@Username, @Password)";

  //Not sure how you create your commands in your project
  //here I'm using the ProviderFactory to create instances of provider specific DbCommands.

  var parameter = dbProviderFactory.CreateParameter();
  parameter.DbType = System.Data.DbType.String;
  parameter.ParameterName = "@Username";
  parameter.Value = AddUsernameTextBox.Text;
  command.Parameters.Add(parameter);

  parameter = dbProviderFactory.CreateParameter();
  parameter.DbType = System.Data.DbType.String;
  parameter.ParameterName = "@Password";
  parameter.Value = AddPasswordTextBox.Text;
  command.Parameters.Add(parameter);

Below is a more complete code sample of using ConnectionStringSettings and DbProviderFactory etc. This is not going to solve your problem, but this is the way to do data access if you're using ADO.NET core as you seem to be doing in your sample.

  ConnectionStringSettings connectionStringSettings = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["SomeConnectionName"];
  if (connectionStringSettings == null)
    throw new Exception("Application config file does not contain a connectionStrings section with a connection called \"SomeConnectionName\"");
  DbProviderFactory dbProviderFactory = DbProviderFactories.GetFactory(connectionStringSettings.ProviderName);
  using (var dbConnection = dbProviderFactory.CreateConnection())
  {
    dbConnection.ConnectionString = connectionStringSettings.ConnectionString;
    dbConnection.Open();
    using (var command = dbConnection.CreateCommand())
    {
      command.CommandText = "INSERT INTO Login([Username],[Password]) VALUES(@Username, @Password)";

      var parameter = dbProviderFactory.CreateParameter();
      parameter.DbType = System.Data.DbType.String;
      parameter.ParameterName = "@Username";
      parameter.Value = AddUsernameTextBox.Text;
      command.Parameters.Add(parameter);

      parameter = dbProviderFactory.CreateParameter();
      parameter.DbType = System.Data.DbType.String;
      parameter.ParameterName = "@Password";
      parameter.Value = AddPasswordTextBox.Text;
      command.Parameters.Add(parameter);

      var dbTransaction = dbConnection.BeginTransaction();
      try
      {
        command.ExecuteNonQuery();
        dbTransaction.Commit();
      }
      catch (Exception)
      {
        dbTransaction.Rollback();
        throw;
      }
    }
  }

the app.Config file that the code above relies on would look like this the following. Of course only the connectionStrings section in the config file is important in this context

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <connectionStrings>
    <add name="SomeConnectionName" providerName="System.Data.OleDb" connectionString="Your Provider Specific Connection String" />
  </connectionStrings>
</configuration>
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The Best way is to use Parameters: '@' By this your code will look much more clearer and easy to understand. And makes your Application more secure.

try this code:

            using (var con = new OleDbConnection(_constring))
            {
                con.Open();
                using (
                    var cmd =
                        new OleDbCommand(
"UPDATE LogIn SET Username=@Username, Password=@Password WHERE (ID = @Id)",
                            con))
                {
                    try
                    {

                        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Username",EditUsernameTextBox.Text);
                        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Password",EditPasswordTextBox.Text);
                        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Id",IDTextBox.Text);


                        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        throw;
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        con.Close();
                    }

                }

Regards!

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2  
AFAIK you cannot use named parameters with Jet (the OP is tagged ms-access) and OLEDB, you must replace the parameters with a question mark and refer to them in the order in which they occur. –  Fionnuala Feb 14 '11 at 0:46

Please protect the single quotes. Also, you may need a closing semicolon in the Access SQL string.

cmd.CommandText = "INSERT INTO LogIn(Username,Password) VALUES('" + AddUsernameTextBox.Text.Replace("'","''") + "','" + AddPasswordTextBox.Text.Replace("'","''") + "');";

It is of course only 100% better to use parameterized queries; from you other questions is this C#/Visual Studio against MS Access through OLE/Jet?

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yup it's C# in visual studio and MS Access through OLE. Tried your statement but i still receive syntax error :( –  pacheco Feb 14 '11 at 4:38
    
@Pac - please see comment against question –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 14 '11 at 4:40

Is ID column an integer? If not you need to wrap values in single quotes, too. Also, try removing the parentheses.

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Most likely, the value in IDTextBox.text is not numeric...

But like Daniel points out, this is very vulnerable to SQL inject..

What would happen if I typed:

' ; DROP TABLE login

in the EditUserNameTextBox field

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2  
It would fail. Access will not run more than one statement, but I am quibbling :) –  Fionnuala Feb 13 '11 at 22:16
    
THanks Remou, I didn't know that. Just wanted to give an example of how dangerous SQL injection can be –  Sparky Feb 13 '11 at 22:44
1  
With Jet/ACE, it's not very dangerous, as no DDL or DML statements can injected via a WHERE clause. However, it is possible to change the number of rows acted upon, which can be dangerous in a case like this with a SQL UPDATE. For more on the specifics with Access see stackoverflow.com/questions/512174/non-web-sql-injection/… . –  David-W-Fenton Feb 14 '11 at 2:15
    
I guess ' -- would be dangerous, effectively emptying out all user name fields... Don't use access myself however –  Sparky Feb 14 '11 at 2:34
    
Er, how would '-- be dangerous in Access? It doesn't mean anything special at all in Jet/ACE/Access SQL, so you'd just be passing criteria that wouldn't return any rows. –  David-W-Fenton Feb 16 '11 at 3:27

Check if this works. You were missing single quotes for the value in your WHERE statement:

"UPDATE
    LogIn
SET
    Username = '" + EditUsernameTextBox.Text + "'
    ,Password = '" + EditPasswordTextBox.Text + "'
WHERE
    (ID = '" + IDTextBox.Text + "')";

Plus, make sure, as Daniel White mentioned, you take care of any SQL Injection.

share|improve this answer
    
still receiving syntax error :/ could it be because my ID DataType is AutoNumber? –  pacheco Feb 13 '11 at 22:13
    
Can you provide the data you're passing in? Are you passing in anything with an apostrophe (single quote) or any other possibly problematic characters? –  fortheworld Feb 13 '11 at 22:16
    
i typed in all alphabets in the textboxes –  pacheco Feb 13 '11 at 22:18
    
That's at least one problem. If you're trying to compare an AutoNumber field to alphabetical characters, then you'll receive an error. Try removing the single quotes from the WHERE clause, and then just type in numerals to test it. Otherwise, your query is essentially syntactically sound. –  fortheworld Feb 13 '11 at 22:28

You missed a pair of apostrophes, if your ID is non-numeric:

WHERE (ID ='" + IDTextBox.Text + "')";
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syntax error still. could it be because my ID DataType is AutoNumber? –  pacheco Feb 13 '11 at 22:15
1  
If ID is an autonumber, it is numeric and does not need quotes, it will not cause your statement to fail. Print out the statement as requested and post it. –  Fionnuala Feb 13 '11 at 22:21

Do the values of EditUsernameTextBox.Text or EditPasswordTextBox.Text themselves have quotes? This will bollix up the SQL.

If so, you'll need to escape them. or don't use string concatenation as pointed out already...

And have you printed the statement out to see what it looks like as requested...?

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how do i print the statement? sorry newbie here –  pacheco Feb 13 '11 at 22:25
    
You can use the immediate window in Visual Studio, I think it is what you are using. –  Fionnuala Feb 13 '11 at 22:33

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