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What rule of thumb do you use for deciding to use node_load() or just writing a direct db_query()?

In a situation I'm looking at right now I need to get some node data and resolve data on two nodereference fields. So that would be 3 calls to node_load(). At some point here, would it be more efficient to construct the query with Joins directly?

This is for use in a self contained module that won't be distributed or used anywhere else, so I don't believe I need to worry about subverting node modification hooks (or do I?).

Edit:
Thinking about my question more, node_load() is only really applicable when you have one node to grab (and then maybe drilling down further into nodereferences like in my example). But as soon as you need to return more than one node based on some criteria, you're pretty much forced to use db_query right? Does Drupal have any abstracted API for writing queries like this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not a full answer (Not sure myself), just some hints.

  • node_load() is using a static cache (in Drupal 7, you can even use the entity_cache module to make it a permanent cache). If the nodes you are loading are being used a second time on the same page, that call will be free.

  • Querying CCK-tables is tricky. The schema structure can change completely based on configuration, for example when using a single or multiple values.

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The reasoning behind using API methods for DB calls over direct DB calls is to provide a DB abstraction layer so that your app could move between supported database engines etc, also it enables your app to gracefully handle any schema changes (however unlikely) that core/module may make to the tables in question. It's also likely easier as @Berdir says for CCK fields and Node_Ref fields, but that depends on which you are more confident with Drupal API& PHP or MySQL...the payoff of doing it the Drupal way is increased future productivity and understanding of the codebase and what is possible :)

Oh and my rule of thumb is - Do it the Drupal way if at all possible (possible being variable depending on app time/cost/performance/whatever requirements)

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