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I am currently learning the usage of Composite Object and I have a few questions.

  1. Why and when should I use composite object? Do we use it only when we have a class we want to use its instances but with a whole different methods?

  2. Considering I want to create a Square class from the Rectangle class (I name it Shape) but doesn't plan to use the initWithHeight:andWidth: within the Shape class. That means I will declare Square header this way.

With the header file

@interface Square : NSObject {
    Shape *square;
}

- (Square*) initWithSide: (int) s;
- (void) setSide: (int) s;
- (int) side;
- (int) area;
- (int) perimeter;
- (id) free;
@end

With the implementation

@implementation Square
- (Square*) initWithSide: (int) s
{
    if(self = [super init])
    {
        square = [[Shape alloc] initWithHeight:s andWidth:s];
    }

    return self;
}
- (void) setSide: (int) s
{
    [square setHeight:s];
    [square setWidth:s]; 
}
- (int) side
{
    return [square width];
}
- (int) area
{
    return [square width]*[square height];
}
- (int) perimeter
{
    return 2*([square width]+[square height]);
}
- (id) free
{
    [square release];
    return square;
}
@end

Question: Am I doing it correct? Is there any better or tidier way to structure composite object since I find the code I wrote is kinda weird. Especially the method to free the memory allocation. Since I have [mySquare release] in the main file, that means I will need to [mySquare free] first before [mySquare release]. Can I combine them so I only need to invoke [mySquare release] to free both memory allocation?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apart from the bizarre and wrong free method and the missing dealloc (assuming you are not using garbage collection) that looks absolutely fine.

And I probably wouldn't name the instance variable square.

Also, you might consider a test in -init to make sure square is succcessfully allocated:

- (id) initWithSide: (int) s
{
    self = [super init];
    if(self != nil)
    {
        square = [[Shape alloc] initWithHeight:s andWidth:s];
        if (square == nil)
        {
            [self release];
            return nil;
        }
    }
    return self;
}

And the return type of initialiser should always be id


Edit: for the dealloc method

-(void) dealloc
{
    [square release];
    [super dealloc];
}
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What will happen if I don't do a test in -init. If the free method is wrong, what is a better or correct way to release the memory allocation for the "square" instance? –  sayzlim Feb 15 '11 at 14:06
1  
@Sayz Lim: If you don't do the test, you'll just have a wrapper object with no instance object. Everything will return 0/nil. You release the instance variables in your dealloc method (see update). –  JeremyP Feb 15 '11 at 15:02
    
@JeremyP Since you overwrite the dealloc method, does that mean the release method will call the overwritten dealloc method when the object is not used anymore. I see that the overwritten dealloc release the square first and dealloc the super which is the instance created in the main file later. –  sayzlim Feb 16 '11 at 5:41
    
@Sayz Lim: The correct term is "overridden". The dealloc method first releases the instance variable and then invokes the super class version of dealloc, in this case NSObject's dealloc. release will invoke your class's dealloc if it determines that the object is no longer in use. –  JeremyP Feb 16 '11 at 8:51
    
@JeremyP Does it mean whenever I create a composite object, I need to override the -dealloc method? Just want to make sure, later on whenever I create a Square instance, I only have to invoke [mySquare release] without having to use -dealloc, can it? –  sayzlim Feb 16 '11 at 14:43

I stumbled into your post. Although, I do not reply to your question: I just created an example project dealing with the composite pattern. Maybe it helps.
In the example I am trying to build an interface FooProtocol to access the concrete types FooObject and FooCollection with the same methods. By this, it is transparent which type the object has. - You can find examples in EnumerableCompositeAppDelegate. Just compile and run the project.

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Written details might help. I'm not really sure what to do by just reading the code. TBH, I'm new to Objective-C environment. –  sayzlim Feb 18 '11 at 16:01

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