Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to open a file in a class constructor. It is possible that the opening could fail, then the object construction could not be completed. How to handle this failure? Throw exception out? If this is possible, how to handle it in a non-throw constructor?

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

If an object construction fails, throw an exception.

The alternative is awful. You would have to create a flag if the construction succeeded, and check it in every method.

share|improve this answer
3  
It would be great to actually propose a "real" solution too, such as passing a istream& parameter :) –  Matthieu M. Feb 14 '11 at 8:03
    
@Matthie Yes, the inversion of control. I keep forgetting about it. Thanks for the reminder. –  BЈовић Feb 14 '11 at 8:15
add comment

My suggestion for this specific situation is that if you don't want a constuctor to fail because if can't open a file, then avoid that situation. Pass in an already open file to the constructor if that's what you want, then it can't fail...

share|improve this answer
2  
And what if the content of the file is empty? Or contains invalid data? –  CashCow Feb 14 '11 at 10:37
4  
The poster only said he wanted to open the file in the constructor. Obviously if he's doing more then it could fail in other ways and would need to be dealt with appropriately. –  jcoder Feb 14 '11 at 12:45
add comment

I want to open a file in a class constructor. It is possible that the opening could fail, then the object construction could not be completed. How to handle this failure? Throw exception out?

Yes.

If this is possible, how to handle it in a non-throw constructor?

Your options are:

  • redesign the app so it doesn't need constructors to be non-throwing - really, do it if possible
  • add a flag and test for successful construction (again, else throw) inside each member function that might legitimately be called immediately after the constructor.
    • This is ugly, and difficult to keep right if you have a volatile group of developers working on the code.
    • You can get some compile-time checking of this by having the object polymorphically defer to either of two implementations: a successfully constructed one and an always-error version, but that introduces heap usage and performance costs.
    • You can move the burden from the called code to the callee by documenting a requirement that they call some "is_valid()" or similar function before using the object: again error prone and ugly, but even more distributed and out of control.
    • You can make this a little easier and more localised for the caller if you support something like: if (X x) ... (i.e. the object can be evaluated in a boolean context), but then you don't have x in scope to query for details of the error.
  • have the caller provide a stream they're responsible for having opened... (known as Dependency Injection or DI)... in some cases, this doesn't work that well:
    • you can still have errors when you go to use the stream inside your constructor, what then?
    • the file itself might be an implementation detail that should be private to your class rather than exposed to the caller: what if you want to remove that requirement later? For example: you might have been reading a lookup table of precalculated results from a file, but have made your calculations so fast there's no need to precalculate - it's painful (sometimes even impractical in an enterprise environment) to remove the file at every point of client usage, and forces a lot more recompilation rather than potentially simply relinking.
  • force the caller to provide a buffer to a success/failure/error-condition variable which the constructor sets: e.g. bool worked; X x(&worked); if (worked) ...
    • this burden and verbosity draws attention and hopefully makes the caller much more conscious of the need to consult the variable after constructing the object
  • force the caller to construct the object via some other function that can use return codes and/or exceptions:
    • if (X* p = x_factory()) ...
    • Smart_Ptr_Throws_On_Null_Deref p_x = x_factory();`
    • X x; // never usable; if (init_x(&x)) ...
    • etc...

In short, C++ is designed to provide elegant solutions to these sorts of issues: in this case exceptions. If you artificially restrict yourself from using them, then don't expect there to be something else that does half as good a job.

(P.S. I like passing variables that will be modified by pointer - as per worked above - I know the FAQ lite discourages it but disagree with the reasoning. Not particularly interested in discussion thereon unless you've something not covered by the FAQ.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I want to open a file in a class constructor.

Almost certainly a bad idea. Very few cases when opening a file during construction is appropriate.

It is possible that the opening could fail, then the object construction could not be completed. How to handle this failure? Throw exception out?

Yep, that'd be the way.

If this is possible, how to handle it in a non-throw constructor?

Make it possible that a fully constructed object of your class can be invalid. This means providing validation routines, using them, etc...ick

share|improve this answer
3  
Not that bad - we do that all the time, code looks neat. –  sharptooth Feb 14 '11 at 7:45
2  
Just because you do it all the time doesn't mean it's good. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 14 '11 at 7:46
4  
Why is opening a file, or any other resource, in a constructor a bad idea? –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Feb 14 '11 at 7:51
3  
@Jörgen Sigvardsson: Because it would be better to write your class in terms of any given istream or ostream object. That way you could do testing replacing the stream with a stringstream. –  Billy ONeal Feb 14 '11 at 7:54
1  
@Jorgen Sigvardsson: This goes against the Dependency Injection philosophy. Your question is better read the other way around: why tie your hand in the back ? By explicitly using a open in your class, you are preventing any reuse from say memory-mapped file for example ? On the other hand, by using a base-class (stream-like) you can pass in anything that implement its interface; this makes testing and reuse easier. –  Matthieu M. Feb 14 '11 at 8:01
show 7 more comments

One way is to throw an exception. Another is to have a 'bool is_open()' or 'bool is_valid()' functuon that returns false if something went wrong in the constructor.

Some comments here say it's wrong to open a file in the constructor. I'll point out that ifstream is part of the C++ standard it has the following constructor:

explicit ifstream ( const char * filename, ios_base::openmode mode = ios_base::in );

It doesn't throw an exception, but it has an is_open function:

bool is_open ( );
share|improve this answer
    
Well, ifstream is an RAII object which manages the reference to the file. That's quite a different case than most of the "classes that open files in their constructors" (that I've seen anyway) Good C++ code doesn't have explicit delete statements either, but it's impossible to implement smart pointers without it. –  Billy ONeal Feb 14 '11 at 7:59
    
Just to mention it: a lot of people don't like the is_open() or is_valid() approach and consider it bad. It's because users of the class can easily forget to call this method and you end up having a partially-constructed class and need to include the is_open() test in a lot of member functions. It might be an option, though, in some cases. –  sstn Feb 14 '11 at 8:18
add comment

A constructor may well open a file (not necessarily a bad idea) and may throw if the file-open fails, or if the input file does not contain compatible data.

It is reasonable behaviour for a constructor to throw an exception, however you will then be limited as to its use.

  • You will not be able to create static (compilation unit file-level) instances of this class that are constructed before "main()", as a constructor should only ever be thrown in the regular flow.

  • This can extend to later "first-time" lazy evaluation, where something is loaded the first time it is required, for example in a boost::once construct the call_once function should never throw.

  • You may use it in an IOC (Inversion of Control / Dependency Injection) environment. This is why IOC environments are advantageous.

  • Be certain that if your constructor throws then your destructor will not be called. So anything you initialised in the constructor prior to this point must be contained in an RAII object.

  • More dangerous by the way can be closing the file in the destructor if this flushes the write buffer. No way at all to handle any error that may occur at this point properly.

You can handle it without an exception by leaving the object in a "failed" state. This is the way you must do it in cases where throwing is not permitted, but of course your code must check for the error.

share|improve this answer
add comment

it depends.

you haven't described your concrete case, and general answer will only fit that concrete case by happenchance.

cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.