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I'd like to know whether I grasped the concept of CRC calculation correctly. I'll provide 2 examples, the first is calculating the remainder using normal subtraction, the 2nd example uses this weird XOR stuff.

Data bits D=1010101010 Generator bits G=10001

Subtraction Approach to calculate remainder:

10101010100000
10001|||||||||
-----|||||||||
  10001|||||||
  10001|||||||
  -----|||||||
  000000100000
         10001
         -----
          1111

R = 1111

XOR approach:

10101010100000
10001|||||||||
-----|||||||||
  10001|||||||
  10001|||||||
  -----|||||||
  00000010000|
        10001|
        ------
        000010

R=0010

Thanks!

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I should probably attach the question, all right: CRC uses the XOR approach, right? Did I do the XOR-example correctly? –  NameZero912 Feb 14 '11 at 17:44

3 Answers 3

Subtraction is wrongly done. In binary modulo, subtraction, addition, division, and multiplication are the same. So, XOR is correct.

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appending 1111 at the end does notsatisfy the need since

10927 % 17 != 0

.

Note that as per the definition, the division should be modulo division as it is based upon modulo mathematics.

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Both answers are correct. =)

(To recheck the first answer:
10101010100000 (binary) mod 10001 (binary)
= 10912 (decimal) mod 17 (decimal)
= 15 (decimal)
= 1111 (binary).)

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