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I want to schedule a task to start in x ms and be able to cancel it before it starts (or just at the beginning of the task).

The first attempt would be something like

var _cancelationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();

var token = _cancelationTokenSource.Token;
Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        Thread.Sleep(100);
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    }).ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        DoWork();
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    }, token);

But I feel like there should be a better way, as this would use up a thread while in the sleep, during which it could be canceled.

What are my other options?

share|improve this question
    
You're probably best off with a timer. –  Massif Feb 14 '11 at 9:38
    
Its really not mush overhead and it reads really well (so it is maintainable). –  Richard Schneider Feb 14 '11 at 9:38
6  
@Richard It's not uncommon to fire off a few hundred tasks. And this code won't deal well with it. –  CodesInChaos Feb 14 '11 at 9:48
    
A timer may be a better option, but I think it still doesn't give me a clean cancelation option. –  Bruno Lopes Feb 14 '11 at 11:05
2  
Some timers, if not all, are not guaranteed to not trigger the Tick event after the timer is stopped, so be careful. –  Hogan Jun 10 '13 at 21:42

6 Answers 6

Like Damien_The_Unbeliever mentioned, the Async CTP includes Task.Delay. Fortunately, we have Reflector:

public static class TaskEx
{
    static readonly Task _sPreCompletedTask = GetCompletedTask();
    static readonly Task _sPreCanceledTask = GetPreCanceledTask();

    public static Task Delay(int dueTimeMs, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        if (dueTimeMs < -1)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("dueTimeMs", "Invalid due time");
        if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
            return _sPreCanceledTask;
        if (dueTimeMs == 0)
            return _sPreCompletedTask;

        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        var ctr = new CancellationTokenRegistration();
        var timer = new Timer(delegate(object self)
        {
            ctr.Dispose();
            ((Timer)self).Dispose();
            tcs.TrySetResult(null);
        });
        if (cancellationToken.CanBeCanceled)
            ctr = cancellationToken.Register(delegate
                                                 {
                                                     timer.Dispose();
                                                     tcs.TrySetCanceled();
                                                 });

        timer.Change(dueTimeMs, -1);
        return tcs.Task;
    }

    private static Task GetPreCanceledTask()
    {
        var source = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        source.TrySetCanceled();
        return source.Task;
    }

    private static Task GetCompletedTask()
    {
        var source = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        source.TrySetResult(null);
        return source.Task;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand something about this code: Doesn't the timer delegate capture the ctr that is newed up, instead of the one pertaining to the ctr that actually represents a delegate??! –  Elliot Jan 13 '13 at 16:12
    
Regarding my obove comment: It seems that I just need to go and properly study closures. –  Elliot Jan 13 '13 at 16:37
    
@Elliot ctr is a captured variable. The actual variable is captured, so changes made to it after the capture still hold. Jon skeet has an article on them: csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter5/Closures.aspx –  Ohad Schneider Jan 13 '13 at 23:24

Since .NET 4.5 has now been released, there's a very simple built-in way to delay a task: just use Task.Delay(). behind the scenes, it uses the implementation that ohadsc decompiled.

share|improve this answer

The correct answer in the future will probably be Task.Delay. However, that's currently only available through the Async CTP (and in the CTP, it's on TaskEx rather than Task).

Unfortunately, because it's only in CTP, there aren't many good links to documentation for it either.

share|improve this answer
4  
The .Delay() and other TAP-based methods are now available for .NET 4.0 outside of the Async CTP via the Async Targeting Pack. Ignore the claims that it works only on VS11, it works wonderfully on VS2010 since it's only a library. –  Allon Guralnek May 24 '12 at 20:08

Look at the TaskFactoryExtensions_Delayed in "Parallel Programming with .NET 4 Samples".

share|improve this answer
    
I checked this out, but I have the impression that this is just delaying the result, not the actual execution of the task? –  StephaneT Jun 11 '12 at 14:07

I haven't tested this, but here is a first-pass at wrapper methods to create an initial 'Delay' Task or to continue after a Delay. If you find issues, feel free to correct.

    public static Task StartDelayTask(int delay, CancellationToken token)
    {
        var source = new TaskCompletionSource<Object>();
        Timer timer = null;

        timer = new Timer(s =>
        {
            source.TrySetResult(null);
            timer.Dispose();
        }, null, delay, -1);
        token.Register(() => source.TrySetCanceled());

        return source.Task;
    }

    public static Task ContinueAfterDelay
      (this Task task, 
           int delay, Action<Task> continuation, 
           CancellationToken token)
    {
        var source = new TaskCompletionSource<Object>();
        Timer timer = null;

        var startTimer = new Action<Task>(t =>
        {
            timer = new Timer(s =>
            {
                source.TrySetResult(null);
                timer.Dispose();
            },null,delay,-1);
        });

        task.ContinueWith
          (startTimer, 
           token, 
           TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion, 
           TaskScheduler.Current);
        token.Register(() => source.TrySetCanceled());
        return source.Task.ContinueWith(continuation, token);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You can implement ContinueAfterDelay using StartDelayTask in one line: task.ContinueWith(t => StartDelayTask(delay, token)).Unwrap().ContinueWith(continuation, token) also see my answer for Microsoft's implementation (a bit more complete) –  Ohad Schneider Feb 1 '12 at 10:45

You can use Token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(int32 milliseconds) overload method to specify number of milliseconds to wait for your task. But key difference between Thread.Sleep(xxx) and Token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(xxx) that later blocks thread until the time specified elapsed or the token has been canceled.

Here is an example

void Main()
{
    var tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
    var token = tokenSource.Token;

    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        // wait for 5 seconds or user hit Enter key cancel the task
        token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(5000);
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        Console.WriteLine("Task started its work");
    });

    Console.WriteLine("Press 'Enter' key to cancel your task");

    Console.Read();

    tokenSource.Cancel();
}
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