Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
for(....)
  if(condition)
    printf(_);
  else
    printf();

what code will come here....

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Johan Kotlinski, Benoit, Jens Gustedt, JeremyP, Paul R Feb 14 '11 at 11:04

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
what do you want?? Please properly explain – Manish Trivedi Feb 14 '11 at 10:10
2  
In case the if-condition evaluates to true, else is never executed. No need to jump anywhere. – Christian Feb 14 '11 at 10:10
    
woud you please add few words to make your question clear. – Unlike Feb 14 '11 at 10:16
    
The following is off topic. The semicolon preceding the keyword "else" would not have been included in Algol or Pascal or in about a half a dozen languages that were popular in the 1970s. – Walter Mitty Feb 14 '11 at 10:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, you want to jump out of the if and the enclosing for loop when condition is true. You can achieve this using break:

for(....) {
  if(condition) {
    printf(_);
    break;
  }
  else
    printf();
}

Note: I added proper indentation and angle brackets to make the code cleaner.

Update after OP's comment

int isPrime = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 10 && !isPrime; i++) {
  isPrime = (16 / i == i);
}
if (isPrime)
  printf("its a prime no");
else
  printf("not a prime no.");

Disclaimer: th condition above is hardly the proper way to detect whether a given number is prime, but still this code snippet illustrates the general idiom of saving the result of an expression from a loop and inspecting it later.

share|improve this answer
    
if 'if condition' becomes false,else part'll be executed,and break is nt used at all. anyway the question is not clear first. – Unlike Feb 14 '11 at 10:27
1  
I'm not even sure if this is what the OP is asking, but if it is then I would avoid the use of break and instead consider including condition in for loop's test: e.g. for (int i=0; condition && i < 10; i++). Using break works and is perfectly valid, but it means you have to read through the code to find all the exit conditions of the for loop, instead of just looking at the for statement itself. – GrahamS Feb 14 '11 at 10:29
    
@GrahamS, same here. Your suggestion is cleaner indeed. I didn't want to start optimizing the solution before ensuring that this is actually what the OP is after. – Péter Török Feb 14 '11 at 10:36
    
@GrahamS: with your approach, you have to put an if statement after the for loop to work out which part of the exit condition applied and whether to printf(_)... :-(. – Tony D Feb 14 '11 at 10:40
    
@Tony: yeah it is just a general style preference/recommendation. If that is a requirement then I might favour break (or use a condition with more than two states) - unfortunately it is difficult to tell what the OP is trying to achieve from his question. – GrahamS Feb 14 '11 at 10:50

The else code is never executed if condition is true:

if (condition)        // If this condition evaluates to true
{
    printf("Hello");  // Then this code is executed
}
else
{
    printf("World");  // If it is false then this code is executed.
}

Edit: Wrapping it in a for loop makes no difference (unless you mean want to actually exit the for loop as well?)

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.