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I have JS code roughly like this:

function myObject()
{
    this.a = 13;

    this.fetchData = function()
    {
        alert(this.a);
        getData(this.processData);
    }

    this.processData = function(data)
    {
        // do stuff with data
        alert(this.a);
    }

    this.fetchData();
}

function getData(callback)
{
    // do async request for data and call callback with the result
}

My problem is: The function fetchData has access to my a variable via the this keyword, but the other function processData does not when called by getData. I understand why this happens, but don't know how to work around it.

How would you approach this problem preferably in OOP style? (The function getData has to be available to multiple classes)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two options:

1) Have getData accept a context parameter (usually called context or thisArg) and use callback.apply(context, ...) or callback.call(context, ...) to call it. So:

function getData(callback, context) {
    // ...when it's time to call it:
    callback.call(context, arg1, arg2);
    // or
    callback.apply(context, [arg1, arg2]);
}

2) Create a function that, when called, will turn around and call the original callback with this set to the correct value. (This is sometimes called "binding".)

For example, using an explicit closure:

this.fetchData = function()
{
    var self = this;

    alert(this.a);
    getData(getDataCallback);

    function getDataCallback(arg1, arg2) {
        self.processData(arg1, arg2);
    }
}

Or have a generic bind function to do it (which will also involve a closure, but in a nice controlled context so it's not closing over stuff you don't need). See link below for an example of a simple bind function.

More: You must remember this

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+1: for option 2, you would call getData(function(){ this.processData(); }); instead of getData(thisProcessData); –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 14 '11 at 10:27
    
@Eric: No, that won't work. this is defined entirely by how a function is called, not where it's defined. Your getData(function(){ this.processData(); }); would have exactly the same problem as getData(this.processData); You can, though, use a closure (I've added a closure example). –  T.J. Crowder Feb 14 '11 at 10:28
    
@T.J. Crowder: of course, you're right. Thanks for adding the example. –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 14 '11 at 10:33
    
Wow, great answer. Thanks! –  akosch Feb 14 '11 at 10:35
    
BTW: does jQuery have a built-in binding function for doing this? –  akosch Feb 14 '11 at 10:39

I think that you only need to define "a" as a local variable so that it is in the cope of both fetchData and getData, something like this:

function myObject() {
   var a = 13;

   this.fetchData = function() {
      alert(a);
      getData(this.processData);
   }

   this.processData = function(data) {
      // do stuff with data
      alert(a);
   }

   this.fetchData();
}

You could also do,

function myObject() {
   this.a = 13;
   var that = this;

   this.fetchData = function() {
      alert(that.a);
      getData(this.processData);
   }

   this.processData = function(data) {
      // do stuff with data
      alert(that.a);
   }

   this.fetchData();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for setting a in private scope of closures fetchData and processData. –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 14 '11 at 10:31

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