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I have thread safe double checked Singleton class that holds a LinkedList with get/set/size methods in the Singleton class. Then I have simple pool class that is using this Singleton class to manage pool of objects.

My question is how can I defend the methods of get/set both in the singleton and the pool class without using sync methods. Here's my code

public class SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern {

    private static SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern s = new SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern();

    private LinkedList<Object> linkedList;

    public int GetListObjectCount() {
        return linkedList.size();
    }

    public Object GetObjectFromList() {
        return linkedList.poll();
    }

    public void SetObjectFromList(Object ee) {
        linkedList.add(ee);
    }

    private SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern() {

        linkedList = new LinkedList<Object>();

    }

    /**
     * SingletonHolder is loaded on the first execution of
     * Singleton.getInstance() or the first access to SingletonHolder.INSTANCE,
     * not before.
     */
    private static class SingletonHolder {
        public static final SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern INSTANCE = new SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern();
    }

    public static SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern getInstance() {
        return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
    }

    // avoid cloning
    public final Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        throw new CloneNotSupportedException();
    }

}

public class SingletonObjectPool  {

    private int maxlistValue = 10;


    public Object GetObject() 
    {
        int listCount = SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern.getInstance().GetListObjectCount();
        if(listCount > 0)
        {
            return SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern.getInstance().GetObjectFromList();
        }
        return null;
    }


    public void SetObject() 
    {
        int listCount = SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern.getInstance().GetListObjectCount();
        if(listCount < maxlistValue)
        {
            SingletonDoubleCheckedLockingPattern.getInstance().SetObjectFromList(new Object());
        }

    }


}
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1  
I've updated your references from "single tone" to "singleton" for the benefit of searches, as the latter is the correct spelling. –  Andrzej Doyle Feb 14 '11 at 11:51
1  
You are not using the double checked locking pattern, which is not a problem in itself. You also create two instances one within the class and one within the holder... –  pgras Feb 14 '11 at 12:00
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2 Answers 2

You could use a BlockingQueue which is thread safe. You shouldn't need to check whether a collection is empty before attempting to remove an element, the collection has a method to do this.

To simplify your code and make it thread safe you can do.

public class SingletonObjectPool  {
    private static final int maxlistValue = 10;
    private static final BlockingQueue queue 
        = new ArrayBlockingQueue(maxListValue);

    public static Object getObject() {
        return queue.poll();
    }


    public static void addObjectAsRequired() {
        queue.offer(new Object());
    }
}
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The only way I can think that you can possibly call methods such as GetListObjectCount without using synchronized, is if the list itself is thread-safe and will behave sensibly when this method is called in the face of concurrent modifications.

In that case, there won't be any other problems, as the reference to the list itself never changes. You may want to declare it as final to make this abundantly clear, and to have the compiler warn anyone who tries to reassign the list. (If this were a requirement, the reference would need to be volatile at the very least, but it opens up lots of other questions in the correctness of multiple operations of your class).

The bottom line is that "thread safety" is not a simple, binary concept. You can't just say a particular class and/or method is thread-safe; rather, it's about what combinations of methods you can call with useful and correct semantics.

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You would also need to call single methods like poll() instead of checking the size() and performing a remove() as you can have a race condition between these operations, note: making it safer also simplifies the code. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Feb 14 '11 at 11:59
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