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Need help to stop the BackgroundWorker thread. I am trying to stop a background worker thread. This is what I am doing:

On stop button click (UI layer):

if (backgroundWorker.IsBusy == true && 
    backgroundWorker.WorkerSupportsCancellation == true)
{
    backgroundWorker.CancelAsync();
}

On DoWork event (UI layer):

if ((backgroundWorker.CancellationPending == true))
{
     e.Cancel = true;
}
else
{
    //Function which progresses the progress bar is called 
    //here with its definition in business layer 
}

Once the DoWork event is fired and my program control is in the function defined in Business layer, how do I revert back to the DoWork event to set ‘e.Cancel = true’?

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6 Answers 6

DoWork will run in it's own thread and is not dependant of the GUI thread.

You do almost everything correct. From the GUI thread, set the CancellationPending to true.

In the DoWork method, you probably have a loop of some sort.

Here you check if CancellationPending == true, but in addition to setting e.Cancel to true, also include a return call to make the method return and effectively stopping the worker. This also causes the WorkerCompleted event to fire on the GUI thread if the method is hooked up.

If the DoWork method perform some long task that is not divided into parts (for example if your DoWork method looks like this:

void DoWork( (object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
   myClass.SomeLongOperation();
}

Then you are out of luck, since you need to manually check the CancellationPending inside the DoWork method to be able to stop it. If the DoWork itself "hangs" and waits for a operation you can't control, you can't stop it (in any orderly fashion) by setting CancellationPending from the GUI thread.

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1  
.. And if you >don't< have a loop in DoWork, then it isn't going to work. –  stuartd Feb 14 '11 at 11:56
1  
@Stuart - That is correct, as mentioned in the answer. If there is no loop, there is no good way of shutting it down without forcefully killing the thread from the GUI thread. –  Øyvind Bråthen Feb 14 '11 at 12:00
    
@Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen - Please tell me what is the BAD way to forcefully kill Backgroundworker thread from GUI thread. (without loop in DoWork) –  Zeeshanef Dec 23 '13 at 8:42
    
@Zeeshanef - That would involve finding the correct thread from the thread pool (should be possible somehow, but I don't know how) and aborting it manually using the Thread.Abort method. I have never tried myself, and hopefully I never wont have to either ;) –  Øyvind Bråthen Jan 3 '14 at 12:47

Setting e.Cancel does nothing, if CancellationPending is true you need to basically break out of DoWork() using return or whatever (after you've stopped what you're doing).

Something like:

private void DoWork(...)
{
  // An infinite loop of work!
  while (true) {
     // If set to cancel, break the loop
     if (worker.CancellationPending) break;

     // Sleep for a bit (do work)
     Thread.Sleep(100);
  }
}

DoWork() executes in a seperate thread to the UI thread, you can report back to the UI thread using BackgroundWorkr.ReportProgress().

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Once the DoWork event is fired and my program control is in the function defined in Business layer, how do I revert back to the DoWork event to set ‘e.Cancel = true’?

You don't. If you want cancellation to be possible during execution of your business layer, then your business layer must support cancellation. So, you have two options:

  1. In your DoWork method, call only short-time business layer methods and check for CancellationPending in between.
  2. Make your business layer methods cancellation-aware, i.e., pass the BackgroundWorker to them and have them periodically check CancellationPending (and retun, once it turns true).
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Keep checking the CancellationPending=True Flag in the else part of your logic, and return when true.

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The code e.Canel = true only sets a state on the BackgroundWorker, so that it knows it has been cancelled, it doesn't actually cancel the process.

You'll have to check the CancellationPending inside the loop of your method and break it or return.

void DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if(e.CancellationPending) {
            return;
        }
        // Long running code
    }
}
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