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What I have here are two methods (killZombie) that handle cases where you have one argument (string) or more than one argument (string[]). Because they do the same thing, I made another method named "killAZombie" that is used by the other two methods. The problem I'm having is that the method "killAZombie" is named... well kind of strangely. Is this a problem that other people encounter too? What is the best way to solve this and name my "KillAZombie" method something else that distinguishes itself more clearly from "killZombie"

public void killZombie(string zombieLocation){
    killAZombie(zombieLocation);
}

public void killZombie(string[] zombieLocations){
    foreach(string zombieLocation in zombieLocations){
        killAZombie(zombieLocation);
    }
}

public void killAZombie(string zombieLocation){
    //Kills a zombie at specified location
}

Another way I can see this problem being solved is by instead of overloading "killZombie" have two different methods like this:

public void killZombie(string zombieLocation){
    //Kills a zombie at specified location
}

public void killZombies(string[] zombieLocations){
    foreach(string zombieLocation in zombieLocations){
        killZombie(zombieLocation);
    }
}

This way we only have two methods that are easier to understand, but then the method isn't overloaded. In my mind, it seems like a good thing to have overloaded methods (this just means there are fewer methods, less clutter) so I'm not sure about this solution either. I'd be interested in hearing what would be the best way to tackle this problem, thanks!

Addendum:

My method actually takes 4 arguments, so the params will be at the end. The params variable is the most important one, so putting it as the last argument to make the params work seems kind of clunky. Is my concern over putting the most important argument last, legitimate enough to split up the methods into KillZombie and KillZombies or is the params still the right way to do things?

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2  
+1 for function and variable names :) –  Serkan Hekimoglu Feb 14 '11 at 15:01
1  
Muaaaah, Brainzzzzzzzzzzzz drools –  Christian Feb 14 '11 at 15:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The latter of your two choices is probably preferable in this case (given that the naming of the function implies that it's operating upon a single "zombie".

However, you might also want to look into the params keyword, just so you know what your options are. For instance, if you'd named your function simply Kill (and if it made sense to do so in this context), you could have:

public void Kill(params string[] zombieNames)
{
    foreach(string name in zombieNames)
    {

    }
}

And you could call it a number of ways:

Kill("Zoey");
Kill("Francis", "Zoey");

string[] survivors = { "Zoey", "Francis", "Bill", "Louis" };

Kill(names);

(Assuming, of course, that your survivors had all been turned into zombies!)

Also, stylistically C# code generally uses pascal casing for function names (KillAZombie rather than killAZombie).

Edit for Addendum

Yes, parameter ordering--while it has no technical relevance--is an important consideration in API design, so if you're going to be taking "less important" parameters, then you'll probably have to do without params.

With that said, I'll stand by my original recommendation: as the function is named (KillZombie versus Kill), I would stick with two versions just for the sake of making your name consistent with the parameters. I would also suggest allowing the user to specify IEnumerable<string> instead of an array. That will allow the developer to pass the names using anything that implements IEnumerable<string>, including a string array.

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Can you comment on my addendum to the original post? Thanks –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:28
    
@sooprise: Done. –  Adam Robinson Feb 14 '11 at 15:34
    
Excellent thanks, I will do just that. Also, I added IEnumerable<string> (I never knew what this was, but now I do, and will use it in the future. Thanks much! :D –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:40

Here are some ideas.

First, the C# convention for public methods is to capitalize them: "KillZombie", not "killZombie".

You can do this with just one method if you want. Here's a method that takes one or more locations. The caller can just provide a list: KillZombies(location1, location2, location3);

private void KillOneZombie(string location) { ... }
public void KillZombies(string location, params string[] additionalLocations)
{
    KillOneZombie(location);
    if (additionalLocations == null) return;
    foreach(string additionalLocation in additionalLocations)
        KillOneZombie(additionalLocation);
}

If you do want to have two methods, consider having one take an IEnumerable<string> instead of an array; that way the caller can pass in a list, a query, an array, whatever.

Your second naming pattern is more standard: KillZombie and KillZombies.

The params variable is the most important one, so putting it as the last argument to make the params work seems kind of clunky. Is my concern over putting the most important argument last, legitimate enough to split up the methods into KillZombie and KillZombies or is the params still the right way to do things?

I would think about how you expect the method to be used. Consider for example:

Console.WriteLine("User: {0} Score: {1}", user[i].Name, scores[i]);

Here we clearly expect that the "params" will be used to support a variable number of arguments in the caller. No one ever does this:

object[] results = new object[] { user[i].Name, scores[i] };
Console.WriteLine("User: {0} Score: {1}", results);

even though that is perfectly legal. If you expect that your method is going to be used like Console.WriteLine, where a varying number of parameters is going to be passed in but the number of parameters is known at compile time, then use params.

If you expect that it is going to be used with the second pattern -- someone has an array of locations -- then do not use params; make two methods, KillZombie and KillZombies, and have one of them take an IEnumerable of strings.

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I have some concerns about using params, can you comment on my addendum to the original post? Thanks. –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:31
1  
@sooprise: Sure thing! –  Eric Lippert Feb 14 '11 at 16:20
    
Can additionalLocations ever actually be null? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Feb 14 '11 at 16:47
1  
@Jeffrey: Yes. It is always legal to call a method that takes "params" with an expression that is convertible to the array, and if you do so, the "normal" call will be prioritized as better than the "expanded array" call during overload resolution. See the overload resolution section of the specification for details. –  Eric Lippert Feb 14 '11 at 17:13
3  
@Joan: Good insight. Yes, everyone involved wishes that we'd had IEnumerable<T> available in the C# 1.0 days. If we'd had, then params would use IEnumerable<T> instead of a mutable array; 99.99% of the time you are only reading that thing. We have "enumerable params" on the future feature list for many years now but it has never been prioritized highly enough to actually make it into the implementation. We considered doing it for LINQ, because it would mean that you could pass a query for the "params" without ToArray on the end. But it wasn't important enough to justify the schedule risk. –  Eric Lippert Feb 14 '11 at 18:42

In this case I'd probably go with your second suggestion. KillZombie kills a single zombie; KillZombies kills multiple zombies.

Another option would be to use a single method with a params argument:

KillZombies("foo");           // kill a single zombie
KillZombies("foo", "bar");    // kill multiple zombies

// ...

public void KillZombies(params string[] zombieLocations)
{
    foreach (string zombieLocation in zombieLocations)
    {
        // kills a zombie at specified location
    }
}

(Note also that standard C# naming convention would be to use KillZombie/KillZombies with an uppercase "K".)

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I like this solution –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:09
1  
To me, the params seems like the best solution, would you agree? –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:10
    
Can you comment on my addendum to the original post? Thanks –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:27
    
@sooprise: I suppose it depends on what the other parameters are. Can you give an example? If having zombieLocations as a final params parameter feels wrong then perhaps you need to revert to the two-method solution (and have KillZombies call KillZombie multiple times). –  LukeH Feb 14 '11 at 16:14

First of all, there are more than just those two alternatives.

In particular, you can use the first method without the extra method.

public void KillZombie(string zombieLocation){
    // Implement zombie killing logic here.
}

public void KillZombie(string[] zombieLocations){
    foreach(string zombieLocation in zombieLocations)
        KillZombie(zombieLocation);
}

But in this case I would recommend having two different methods. Granted, they do similar things but one takes zombies and one takes a single zombie. The method name should reflect this.

Analogously, the .NET List class has similar methods Add and AddRange.

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I think that's what I have in the second code block? I made an edit that you maybe didn't see when you where writing this comment? –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:05
    
@sooprise Well in your second code block your methods have different names. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 14 '11 at 15:05
    
I see, so you can call killZombies(string) from killZombies(string[]) if you use the correct arguments? I wasn't sure about this, seems like a good idea. –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:07
    
@sooprise You definitely can. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 14 '11 at 16:09

Your example is sadly wrong - you could also use a params array to allow calls like KillZombies(location1, location2, location3). Params arrays allow an underterminedn umber of aprameters.

That said, it often is done for easier use. If you have 3 ovterloads beause they are all used, then there is nothing wrong with having them, or?

Look at the differentString.Format methods.

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what about using this :

public void killZombies(string zombieLocation, params string[] zombieLocations){
    killZombie(zombieLocation);
    if(zombieLocations != null) {
        foreach(string zombieLocation in zombieLocations){
            killZombie(zombieLocation);
        }
    }
}

You can pass either one or several zombies.

[edit] as commented, this update disallow killing no zombie

share|improve this answer
    
You can also pass in no zombies, which might not be desirable. –  Eric Lippert Feb 14 '11 at 15:08
1  
I don't know about you, but "no zombies" seems like the ideal... –  Massif Feb 14 '11 at 15:11
    
@Eric Lippert: this can be solved by checking zombieLocations.Length check –  Steve B Feb 14 '11 at 15:24
    
@Steve B He probably rather meant that killZombies(emptyArray) doesn't make a lot of sense –  Christian Feb 14 '11 at 15:27
    
Can you comment on my addendum to the original post? Thanks –  sooprise Feb 14 '11 at 15:27

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