Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to count the number of replacements a Regex.Replace call makes?

E.g. for Regex.Replace("aaa", "a", "b"); I want to get the number 3 out (result is "bbb"); for Regex.Replace("aaa", "(?<test>aa?)", "${test}b"); I want to get the number 2 out (result is "aabab").

Ways I can think to do this:

  1. Use a MatchEvaluator that increments a captured variable, doing the replacement manually
  2. Get a MatchCollection and iterate it, doing the replacement manually and keeping a count
  3. Search first and get a MatchCollection, get the count from that, then do a separate replace

Methods 1 and 2 require manual parsing of $ replacements, method 3 requires regex matching the string twice. Is there a better way.

share|improve this question
    
This is for a simple command line utility that could get called with any regex search and replace patterns as command line arguments. So ideally would want a generic solution that doesn't assume knowledge of the pattern in advance. Really though this is for interest - what's the best way of doing this in .Net? It seems like the MatchEvaluator approach with manual parsing of $ replacements is the way forward, but it's a bit messy :( –  Simon D Feb 14 '11 at 16:50
    
Simon, see my edit. –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Thanks to both Chevex and Guffa. I started looking for a better way to get the results and found that there is a Result method on the Match class that does the substitution. That's the missing piece of the jigsaw. Example code below:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace regexrep
{
    class Program
    {
        static int Main(string[] args)
        {
            string fileText = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(args[0]);
            int matchCount = 0;
            string newText = Regex.Replace(fileText, args[1],
                (match) =>
                {
                    matchCount++;
                    return match.Result(args[2]);
                });
            System.IO.File.WriteAllText(args[0], newText);
            return matchCount;
        }
    }
}

With a file test.txt containing aaa, the command line regexrep test.txt "(?<test>aa?)" ${test}b will set %errorlevel% to 2 and change the text to aabab.

share|improve this answer
1  
(Match match) can be simplified to just the variable name "match" as the type is implied. –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 17:08
    
Thanks Chevex, edited. –  Simon D Feb 14 '11 at 17:09
    
I was unaware of the Result() method on the match object. That is a nice quick and easy way to just execute some functionality on each match while still letting the Replace() do it's job. Good work Simon. –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 17:39
    
Other answers have my upvotes, but the key for me is the match.Result, so accepting my own answer for this. Thanks all for help. –  Simon D Feb 18 '11 at 15:12
1  
Nothing wrong with accepting your own answer. –  Alex Ford Feb 18 '11 at 22:45

You can use a MatchEvaluator that runs for each replacement, that way you can count how many times it occurs:

int cnt = 0;
string result = Regex.Replace("aaa", "a", m => {
  cnt++;
  return "b";
});

The second case is trickier as you have to produce the same result as the replacement pattern would:

int cnt = 0;
string result = Regex.Replace("aaa", "(?<test>aa?)", m => {
  cnt++;
  return m.Groups["test"] + "b";
});
share|improve this answer
1  
And here is the lambda equivalent to my answer :3 –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 16:15
1  
@Chevex: I took a little longer for me to answer, as I tested the code first. ;) –  Guffa Feb 14 '11 at 16:47
    
See my comment on Chevex's answer - this will only work if you know the patterns in advance. Otherwise you need to parse the regex replace string. –  Simon D Feb 14 '11 at 16:49
    
I had no need to test the code, I copied it directly from a project where it has been in use for months and added a count variable. Then I took your syntax with lambda and adapted my answer to use a lambda instead of a declared method. ;) –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 16:49
    
Also, I +1'd your answer after you posted it. So your snarky sarcasm is unnecessary. –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 16:54

This should do it.

     int count = 0;
     string text = Regex.Replace(text,
          @"(((http|ftp|https):\/\/|www\.)[\w\-_]+(\.[\w\-_]+)+([\w\-\.,@?^=%&amp;:/~\+#]*[\w\-\@?^=%&amp;/~\+#])?)", //Example expression. This one captures URLs.
          match =>
          {
               string replacementValue = String.Format("<a href='{0}'>{0}</a>", match.Value);
               count++;
               return replacementValue;
          });

I am not on my dev computer so I can't do it right now, but I am going to experiment later and see if there is a way to do this with lambda expressions instead of declaring the method IncrementCount() just to increment an int.

EDIT modified to use a lambda expression instead of declaring another method.

EDIT2 If you don't know the pattern in advance, you can still get all the groupings (The $ groups you refer to) within the match object as they are included as a GroupCollection. Like so:

     int count = 0;
     string text = Regex.Replace(text,
          @"(((http|ftp|https):\/\/|www\.)[\w\-_]+(\.[\w\-_]+)+([\w\-\.,@?^=%&amp;:/~\+#]*[\w\-\@?^=%&amp;/~\+#])?)", //Example expression. This one captures URLs.
          match =>
          {
               string replacementValue = String.Format("<a href='{0}'>{0}</a>", match.Value);
               count++;
               foreach (Group g in match.Groups)
               {
                    g.Value; //Do stuff with g.Value
               }
               return replacementValue;
          });
share|improve this answer
    
This will work (thank you!), but is basically my method 1. To make it work for generic input and output, you'd need to parse the ${test} in the replacement, so we need something more complicated (the "manual parsing of $ replacements" I refer to). –  Simon D Feb 14 '11 at 16:48
    
Match objects include the $ groups as a GroupCollection attached to them. If you don't know the expression beforehand and don't know how many groups would be included, then loop through the group collection like my EDIT2 does. I don't do anything with the group value in the answer but it should be easy for you to see how you could. –  Alex Ford Feb 14 '11 at 17:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.