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How to check whether or not C++ type is trivially copyable? I have a class, which uses memcpy and memcmp functions with specified template type T and I would like to fire assert for types, that are not safe to copy with memcpy. Is there any way to do that (with existing standard)?

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You may be able to use the is_pod type trait. What is your definition of "safe to copy with memcpy"? If an object has a pointer data member that points to an owned dynamically allocated object, is that "safe to copy with memcpy"? –  James McNellis Feb 14 '11 at 16:15
    
@James: The definition is, trivial copy constructor- that is, the type does not have a user-defined copy constructor, nor any base classes or data members with such. –  Puppy Feb 14 '11 at 16:17
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The definition from standard "A trivially copyable class is a class that: - has no non-trivial copy constructors (12.8), - has no non-trivial copy assignment operators (13.5.3, 12.8), - has a trivial destructor (12.4)." –  axe Feb 14 '11 at 16:20
    
@DeadMG, @axe: I suspect @James knows both those definitions, but he still raises a very good question - is that really the correct thing to check for what you're trying to do? –  aschepler Feb 14 '11 at 16:23
    
I'm trying to make it impossible for someone to use my class with types, that have non-trivial copy-constructor. –  axe Feb 14 '11 at 16:24

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, not possible in C++98/C++03. Things like this are why <type_traits> was added to C++0x. Some of the features from <type_traits> can be implemented in C++03, often using the SFINAE principle, but several, including std::is_trivially_copyable<T>, will simply require built-in compiler support.

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Yes, that was my impression too. Thanks. –  axe Feb 14 '11 at 16:23

There are type traits available for this in boost.

However, you're wasting your time- memcpying a type is not going to be faster than what your optimizer will produce with a copy constructor if the type is trivially copyable. Just use the copy constructor.

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Good point. (more chars) –  aschepler Feb 14 '11 at 16:20
    
Which type traits? is_pod is not exactly what I'm looking for, as Maxim pointed it is nearly the same. –  axe Feb 14 '11 at 16:21
    
However, you're wasting your time- memcpying a type is not going to be faster than what your optimizer will produce with a copy constructor if the type is trivially copyable. Just use the copy constructor. I'ts not for the performance, I just don't want my class to work for types with non-trivial copy constructor. I could specialize it for all integral types, however then it will not work for POD's. –  axe Feb 14 '11 at 16:22

The closest thing is boost::is_pod<>.

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However, it does not "just work" for class types. –  ThomasMcLeod Oct 27 '14 at 16:42

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