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The answer to this related question says one dimensional arrays are zero inited. From a small test I just ran, it seems multi-dimensional arrays are not zero inited. Any idea why?

The spec seems to specify that the init of a multi-dimensional array is equivalent to a set of single-dimensional array inits, in which case all the cells should have been zero inited.

The test I ran is equivalent to:

public class Foo {
  static int[][] arr;
  public static void bar() {
    arr = new int[20][20];

    // in the second run of Foo.bar(), the value of arr[1][1] is already 1
    // before executing the next statement!
    arr[1][1] = 1;
  }
}
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How do you check the value? I see it returns 0 all the time no matter how many times you run it. –  fmucar Feb 14 '11 at 16:21
    
@fmucar - it's a debugger issue - please see the answer I posted for more details. –  ripper234 Feb 14 '11 at 16:36
    
see my answer below. –  fmucar Feb 14 '11 at 16:53
    
@fmucar - this is not the case. Take another look at the screenshot. It shows a spot where the JVM thinks a[0][1] == 0, but the debugger thinks otherwise. –  ripper234 Feb 14 '11 at 16:57
    
Then i would say, interesting finding. Possibly (de)-bugger is somehow getting the old value. –  fmucar Feb 14 '11 at 17:14
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Nope, multi-dimensional arrays are zero-initialized just fine:

public class Foo {
  static int[][] arr;
  public static void bar() {
    arr = new int[20][20];

    System.out.println("Before: " + arr[1][1]);
    // in the second run of Foo.bar(), the value of arr[1][1] is already 1
    // before executing the next statement!
    arr[1][1] = 1;
    System.out.println("After: " + arr[1][1]);
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    bar();
    bar();
  }
}

Output:

Before: 0
After: 1
Before: 0
After: 1

If you still have doubts, find a similarly short but complete program which demonstrates the problem :)

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2  
I was getting ready to paste a similar snippet only to find yours. What's your sleep schedule? (so I can pretty much stop trying when you are up) –  Bala R Feb 14 '11 at 16:22
2  
@shadowfoxml: See meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/555/… –  Jon Skeet Feb 14 '11 at 16:23
    
Thanks. See my answer. –  ripper234 Feb 14 '11 at 16:26
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Seems the problem is in the debugger or in the groovy runtime. We're talking about java code that is called from a groovy unit test in IntelliJ.

Take a look at this screenshot (check out the watch and the line the debugger is at):

enter image description here

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// in the second run of Foo.bar(), the value of arr[1][1] is already 1
// before executing the next statement!

No it isn't. Show more of your code, When I run this:

public class Foo {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    bar();
    bar();
  }
  static int[][] arr;
  public static void bar() {
    arr = new int[20][20];
    System.out.println(arr[1][1]);
    arr[1][1] = 1;
  }
}

I get 0 twice.

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Heh, check out my answer. –  ripper234 Feb 14 '11 at 16:27
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It is a static array. So in the first call it will set arr[1][1] to 1

In the second call, just before the re-initialization takes places (before arr = new int[20][20];) before this line executed, the value will still be 1.

If you are checking the value at that time then it is normal.

As you describe this only happens in the second call, this makes sense to me. It will continue to happen for all calls except the first one. :)

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