Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have developed a C# script that opens an XLS file, parses it and creates a list of XML files validating them.
Every main steps of the program is logged with something like this:

Console.WriteLine("Step Creating Xml 1... DONE!)
Console.WriteLine("Step Validating Xml 1... DONE!)

The XLS file path is currently hard-coded and I'm creating a tiny GUI with Windows Forms to allow the user to select the XLS file and read the steps made by the program in a TextBox.

I had no problem in creating the button to open the file dialog to select the XSL file but then, once selected, I'm puzzled on how to code the part to show the program's steps information to the user.

Which is the most common method to accomplish this task keeping the core program GUI agnostic?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As said in other answers, raise an event that your GUI handles showing your log text. This is a complete examples:

1) first of all think about what informations carry with the event and extend EventArgs class for define you argument event class. I suppose to expose a string that is your log text:

public class LogEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public string messageEvent {get;set;}
}        

2) For semplicity suppose to have your MyApplication class that expose a business method you want log. We will define and raise an event from here. Logging will be the private method who raise our log event.

public class MyApplication
{
    public void BusinessMethod(){
        this.Logging("first");
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
        this.Logging("second");
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(3000);
        this.Logging("third");
     }
}

3) Implement the event raise. For handle an event we use a delegate, that is both a description of what method declaration must be implemented in the receiver (your GUI) to consume the event and the pointer to the receiver method. We declare the event OnLogging. Inside Logging method we raise the event setting the argument with log message. We have to check the not null event handler because if there are no listener for the event, the handle will be null (null pointer to receiver event consumer method).

    public delegate void OnLoggingEventHandler(object sender, LogEventArgs e);
    public event OnLoggingEventHandler OnLogging;

    private void Logging(string message)
    {
        LogEventArgs logMessage = new LogEventArgs();
        logMessage.messageEvent = message;
        if (OnLogging != null)
        {
            OnLogging(this, logMessage);
        }
    }

4) Now we have to implement a listener of the event and a method that consume it. Suppose to have a windows form with a button that launch your application business method and a textbox where show log messages. This is our form without event listener and consumer.

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        MyApplication myApp = new MyApplication();
        myApp.BusinessMethod();
    }
}

5) We define a consumer method that handle the event writing on our textbox the log messages received by the event raised. Of course the method has the same signature of the delegate.

private void MyApplication_OnLogging(object sender, LogEventArgs e)
{
    this.textBox1.AppendText(e.messageEvent + "\n");
}

6) With C# native operator we bind our OnLogging event to the event consumer.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        MyApplication myApp = new MyApplication();

        myApp.OnLogging += new MyApplication.OnLoggingEventHandler(MyApplication_OnLogging);
        myApp.BusinessMethod();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
amazing answer, thanks. –  systempuntoout Aug 10 '11 at 7:18

Instead of writing Console.WriteLine when logging, simply raise an event on an object that the GUI responds to:

public delegate void LogDelegate(String _data);
public class Logger
{
    public event LogDelegate OnLog;

    public void Log(String _data)
    {
        if(OnLog != null)
            OnLog(_data);
    }
}

Then, everywhere your app does a Console.WriteLine it simply calls that Log method on that class. Your GUI hooks up to the OnLog event and does what it wants with it.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, what does LogDelegate do and where the OnLog event is declared? –  systempuntoout Feb 15 '11 at 7:42
    
@systempuntoout, the log delegate is just the type of event. The OnLog event is declared within that Logger class. Your code would create an instance of this class and expose it. Your GUI code would add a handler to the OnLog event and process accordingly. –  Moo-Juice Feb 15 '11 at 10:52
    
I've edited your code to make it actually work ;) You've forgotten to add the LogDelegate to the event. –  Stormenet May 27 '11 at 6:58
    
You probably want to use var handler = OnLog; if (handler != null) handler (_data); –  Courtney D May 27 '11 at 7:14
    
@Stormenet, thank-you, I had not noticed that! @Courtney - why? –  Moo-Juice May 27 '11 at 9:59

I would create a private method in your form class called something like WriteLog or WriteOutputMessage and inside that method I would touch the UI, for example appending a new line of text to a multiline textbox. in this way if in the future you want to use another control to show the output, like a grid or a listview, you only have to change 1 method.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what OP doesn't want, "keeping the core program GUI agnostic" –  Juan Mendes Feb 14 '11 at 17:04
    
yes but that method I mentioned would be inside form1.cs for example, it's clear that at least the UI should know what control to use to display the messages. If he has some business managers or core classes they will not know it but the form must know. –  Davide Piras Feb 14 '11 at 17:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.