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I have aa number of NSMutableString's in my app (almost 10-11); all defined as ivar/property

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableString *str1;

I read somewhere that it is better to use "copy" for strings. Is that true? If yes, can I just replace retain to copy in my app and remove the release in dealloc ?

Do I need to consider some other things as well ?

Also, is it normal to have 10-11 NSMutableString's in 1 app..I mean from memory usage perspective ? I also have 4-5 NSMutableDictionary's as well in my app. Please let me know if that is fine.

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I know that it is best to use copy with NSString objects, but I'm not sure what the rule is with NSMutableString objects. I look forward to seeing an answer to this question. –  Carter Allen Feb 14 '11 at 17:37
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3 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

(note: the NSMutableString specific response is a ways down)

I have aa number of NSMutableString's in my app (almost 10-11); all defined as ivar/property

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableString *str1; I read somewhere that it is better to use "copy" for strings. Is that true?

yes, copying NSString (not talking about NSMutableString quite yet) should be the default. the reason (as stated by other posters) is that the implementation of an immutable instance can simply retain itself in its implementation of copyWithZone:. also, copy gives you the expected behavior. in other words, there is not a use for retaining a string if it is in fact immutable. in order to guarantee that you're dealing with an immutable string, you simply copy at creation and set.

If yes, can I just replace retain to copy in my app and remove the release in dealloc?

copy, like retain returns an object which you must explicitly release (e.g., in dealloc) in non-garbage collected environments. immutable strings are still reference-counted. there are exceptions to this, notably:

  • CF/NS-String literals exist for the program's duration

  • you can use CF-APIs to create strings which are never released, or are managed beyond the scope of traditional retain/release mechanisms

  • NS-Type subclasses could implement another scheme (although usual considerations of this are flawed)

Do I need to consider some other things as well?

now we get to the NSMutable-type details. the implementation of property syntax invokes copy. as we know, -[NSMutableString copy] returns an immutable NSString. this is an issue waiting to happen for a naive implementation, since your NSMutableString ivar is now an NSString, using default-synthesized setter implementation.

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableString *str1;`
// or
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSMutableString *str1;`

when declaring:

 @property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableString *str1;`

you may use the default synthesized-implementation.

but there's a twist when declaring:

 @property (nonatomic, copy) NSMutableString *str1;`

you should not use the default synthesized-implementation. instead, you should write your own:

- (void)setStr1:(NSMutableString *)arg
{
    /* locking/observing/undo/etc omitted */
    NSMutableString * copy = [arg mutableCopy];
    NSMutableString * prev = str1;
    str1 = copy;
    [prev release];
}

- (NSMutableString *)str1
{
  /* locking/observing/etc omitted */
  /* don't return something the clients thinks they may
     possibly modify, and don't return something you may
     modify behind their back
  */
    return [[str1 mutableCopy] autorelease];
  // -- or???
    return [[str1 retain] autorelease];
}

hmm... that's not very clear, and not very considerate for clients. it also implies a lot of unnecessary things, and introduces additional copy-overhead. let's re-evaluate this.

additional considerations/problems at this point:

  • the default-setter requires that the client makes a mutableCopy of the string, if they only hold an immutable string. that is immediately turned into a unique copy by you, in the setter, since you can't expect the client to create a unique mutableCopy just for you -- besides, that's the duty of class's implementation. so NSMutableString is a bad argument for the setter. NSString is the appropriate setter, unless you're retaining the string.

  • NSMutableString is also an ambiguous getter -- see the implementation. does it copy+autorelease or retain+autorelease? there isn't a standard expectation for the general form. also, clients may depend on one specific behavior. this really is an implementation detail of the class, unless you're dealing with tightly coupled objects. tightly coupled objects are those which are basically co-dependent, and not generally reusable in other contexts. that concept's fine, you may just be using a private class for several reasons. in either case, copy/write semantics to external clients and subclasses is not (implicitly) clear, and the implementation is dangerous.

  • sharing an NSMutableString is generally a bad design. NSMutableString is not thread-safe. it makes no sense for clients to access and mutate the string - it's dangerous. any design which shared objects which are not thread safe should be considered with care. sharing in this case also extends to subclass usage (so make it @private, wherever possible)

  • retain is also generally a bad design -- the clients are not going to know when the string's been (or is being) modified externally, unless you add equivalent external code to support that.

  • depending on how the interface is used, this can also introduce a lot of unnecessary copying. boo.

ok - now we're pretty convinced our 'improvement' is still a bad idea in most cases =) how can we improve the design?

you should, apart from exceptional cases of tightly coupled objects, declare/implement your property as follows:

@interface MONThing : NSObject
{
@private
    NSMutableString * str1;
}

/* note: passes/returns NSString */
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString * str1;

@end

@implementation MONThing

// no need for clients to create a mutableCopy
- (void)setStr1:(NSString *)arg
{
  /* locking/observing/undo/etc omitted */
    NSMutableString * copy = [arg mutableCopy];
    NSMutableString * prev = str1;
    str1 = copy;
    [prev release];
}

// the result is clearly defined. return a copy for
// thread-safety, expected behavior, and to minimize
// further copies when handling the result.
- (NSString *)str1
{
  /* locking/observing/etc omitted */
  /* don't return something the clients thinks they
     may possibly modify, and don't return something
     you may modify behind their back
  */
    return [[str1 copy] autorelease];
}

@end

your interface is now improved, more correct, requires less documentation and performs better.

you can also remove publicly visible accessors if you don't need them.

we can live with that interface, where it is required.

but there's more! as it turns out, the interface is necessary less often than many people think. we can avoid many of the issues altogether in most cases by simply avoiding use of NSMutableString as an ivar where possible.

as mentioned earlier, NSMutableString is not thread-safe, it's easier and more efficient in many cases to use a (copied) NSString ivar when your string is small, or does not change frequently. by adding the mutable string to the interface (as above), you'll have to guarantee thread-safety manually. in many cases, it is optimal to do something along these lines:

@interface MONThing : NSObject
{
    NSString * str1;
}

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString * str1;

@end

@implementation MONThing

@synthesize str1;

- (void)updateTimeElapsed:(NSTimeInterval)seconds
{
    NSMutableString * s = [NSMutableString stringWithFormat:@"%f seconds", seconds];
    /* ...some mutations... */
    self.str1 = s;
}

@end

of course, there will be a few exceptions to this -- where you will need a mutable ivar, but it's best to use immutable ivars where possible, and where in doubt, rather than introducing a ton of threading complexities. in most cases, you can remove the use of mutable strings from interfaces, and build the strings when necessary (as demonstrated above).

collections (NSMutableArray, NSMutableDictionary, NSMutableSet, etc), on the other hand, are required more often in implementations, and are more complex in general.

good luck!

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3  
+1 for highlighting the preference for immutability. –  Abizern Feb 15 '11 at 13:18
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While Taskinoor's answer is correct, I'd like to add a bit more explanation.

The recommendation is to use copy for classes that are part of a class cluster that have mutable/immutable pairs; such as NSString/NSMutableString NSArray/NSMutableArray NSDictionary/NSMutableDictionary NSSet/NSMutableSet

The reason for this is that it is possible to have a property that is declared as an immutable type (such as NSString) yet pass it a mutable type (such as NSMutableString). In which case it is possible to change the property from outside the class as Taskinoor describes.

Using copy is recommended, because it behaves sensibly with class clusters. sending copy to a mutable class returns an immutable copy of the object (i.e. sending a copy message to an NSMutableString returns an NSString). But, sending copy to an immutable counterpart is equivalent to sending it a retain message.

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Got a deep understand, thanks! –  Kjuly Dec 30 '11 at 14:39
    
(i.e. sending a copy message to an NSMutableString returns an NSString). So how can I get two different version of mutable string? –  rakeshNS Jul 22 '12 at 6:08
    
@rakeshNS what you do is send the mutableCopy message to a mutable string, which returns a mutable copy of a mutable string. –  Abizern Jul 22 '12 at 7:29
    
@Abizern Thanks –  rakeshNS Jul 22 '12 at 11:09
    
@Abizern I think you should clarify that "copy" is only necessary if the property is "readwrite". For example if I have @.property (readonly) NSString* foo; then specifying "copy" is not important. –  John Henckel Jun 9 at 15:50
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For mutable string copy and retain have different result. If you make a copy of str1 to str2 then any change to str1 will not reflect in str2 and any change in str2 will not reflect in str1, as they are separate object. But if str1 is retained to str2 then both are referring to same mutable string object and change via str1 will reflect in str2. But NSString is not mutable. So for simple string (that is, not mutable string) copy is just increasing the reference count, that means it is internally treated like retain (I am not 100% sure about treating copy like retain for non-mutable objects, but saw this on SO in some different question. Googling, I will edit if I can find the link.).

And if you use copy then you still need to release that in dealloc.

Having 10 - 11 normal sized string should have no negative effect on memory usage. A typical app may contain much more strings. By normal size I mean that you are not appending 1 million characters in a string. That will be a serious problem. The memory taken by a string will increase as the length of the string increases. Same goes for dictionary. The memory taken by the dictionary will depend on what you are storing in the dictionary. The dictionary itself don't have much overhead. You can always check the memory usages of your app by using instrument.

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1  
Could someone please confirm the answer above as taskinoor is not 100% sure –  testndtv Feb 14 '11 at 18:09
1  
taskinoor's explanation is correct. –  Noah Witherspoon Feb 14 '11 at 18:13
    
ok.cool..I also edited/added one more part to my question..Could someone please also answer that. (regarding memory usage) –  testndtv Feb 14 '11 at 18:29
    
Even though I haven't used Instruments much, I just ran "Allocations" and I can see the "Overall Allocations" continuously going up...it almost shows 20 MB after about 10 minutes of usage of my app. Is that normal or is there some issue ? I mean while the allocation is going up, it does not show any leaks (via NSZombie) –  testndtv Feb 14 '11 at 18:41
    
20 MB should not be much, even for low end devices. Try to figure out which objects are taking memory when you are running the app for long time. Some bitmaps may be cached, or something similar. It is unlikely that strings are taking that much memory, unless you have really long strings. In general media data like bitmap take much more memory than text data. –  taskinoor Feb 14 '11 at 18:45
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