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I'm not C++ developer and I'm trying to figure out why when I return a C-string from a function I'm getting garbage out.

#include <stdio.h>

const char* tinker(const char* foo);

int main(void)
{
    const char* foo = "foo";
    foo= tinker(foo);
    printf(foo); // Prints garbage
    return 0;
}

const char* tinker(const char* foo)
{
    std::string bar(foo);
    printf(bar.c_str());  // Prints correctly
    return bar.c_str();
}
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1  
inside tinker try std::string bar = new std::string(foo); –  Mr Coder Feb 14 '11 at 17:42
2  
@jason First, it would be std::string* bar = new std::string(foo); Second, this would be a memory leak because no one is freeing the dynamically allocated string object. –  HighCommander4 Feb 14 '11 at 17:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To add to what others said, this is one way to get it to work:

#include <stdio.h>

std::string tinker(const char* foo);
int main(void)
{
     const char* foo = "foo";
     std::string foo2= tinker(foo);
     printf(foo2.c_str()); // Prints correctly
     return 0;
}  

std::string tinker(const char* foo)
{     
     std::string bar(foo);
     return bar; 
} 

Here the std::string object is copied* through the return value and you are printing the copy in main().

*popular string implementations employ optimizations like reference counting that avoid actually copying the string. In addition, in C++0x the string object will be moved, not copied.

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I had to change the tinker prototype too but this works! Thanks! –  Nick Gotch Feb 14 '11 at 17:55
    
@Nick thanks, corrected it –  HighCommander4 Feb 14 '11 at 17:59
return bar.c_str();

This line returns the char* of a temporary object, which gets deleted at the end of the function, and so in main() foo points to the deleted object char*.

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Because bar lives on tinker's stack; after leaving the function, its c_str() is gone.

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You're returning a pointer to a buffer internal to bar, but then you're destroying bar (and the buffer) before you use that pointer.

If you need the content of bar after the function returns, return bar instead of bar.c_str().

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Because you're allocating bar in tinker's stack. When tinker ends, its stack is reclaimed, bar is deleted, so the pointer you're returning points to deallocated memory, ie it's not valid anymore when you exit the function.

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You're returning a C-string that's based on the internal memory of a std::string. However, this is being printed AFTER your bar is destructed. This memory is garbage by the time it reaches the printf(foo); line.

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Great explanation, thanks! –  Nick Gotch Feb 14 '11 at 17:55

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