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what is the difference between pointer , reference and dereference in c?

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They are related. ("Not real" questions don't get real answers.) –  delnan Feb 14 '11 at 18:35
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I don't understand the question. There are pointers in C, and you can dereference them, but there aren't references. That's a C++ thing. –  David Thornley Feb 14 '11 at 18:35
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@David: prior to C++ being published, there were references in C. C pointers are a kind of reference -- use of the unary * operator isn't called "dereferencing" for no reason. Once C++ was published and used the word "reference" for a different specific kind of reference, it became more difficult, since C clearly doesn't have those. –  Steve Jessop Feb 14 '11 at 18:40
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7 Answers 7

Here is a memory map; a representation of memory as a sequence of blocks:

    address    01   02   03
             +----+----+----+...
data within  | 23 | 6f | 4a |
             +----+----+----+...

Now suppose we create a character:

char c = 'z';  // 'z' is 7a in hex

Further suppose c is stored at address 01, so our memory looks like so:

    address    01   02   03
             +----+----+----+...
data within  | 7a | 6f | 4a |
             +----+----+----+...

Now, let's create a pointer:

char* p = &c;  // point at c

p may be stored at address 02:

    address    01   02   03
             +----+----+----+...
data within  | 7a | 01 | 4a |
             +----+----+----+...

Here the pointer p is at address 02 and it points at address 01. That's the meaning of p = &c;. When we dereference the pointer p (at address 02) we look at what's in the address pointed at by p. That is, p points at address 01, and so dereferencing p means looking inside address 01.

Finally, lets create a reference:

char& r = c;

Here the memory layout doesn't change. That is, no memory is used to store r. r is a sort of alias for c, so when we refer to r we practically refer to c. r and c are conceptually one. Changing r means changing c, and changing c means changing r.

When you create a reference you must initialize, and once initialized you cannot re-initialize it with another target. That is, above the reference r means and forever will mean c.

Also related are const references. These are the same as a reference, except they are immutable:

const char& r = c;
r = 'y';  // error; you may not change c through r
c = 'y'   // ok. and now r == 'y' as well

We use const references when we are interested in reading the data but frown upon changing it. By using a const reference the compiler will not copy the data, so this gives us ideal performance, but also forbid us from changing the data, for correctness.

In a sense, you can say that references are a compile-time feature, whereas pointers are a runtime feature. So references are faster and cheaper than pointers, but come with certain constraints and implications. Like other compile-time-vs-runtime alternatives, we sometimes pick one over the other for performance, sometimes for static analysis and sometimes for flexibility.

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There's no explicit reference type in C like in C++. Anywhere anybody says "reference" in context of C language you can assume a pointer.

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Agreed, make that assumption where it's plausible in context. On a quick check, it's also used in the C standard in a more general sense, to mean a requirement in one object file that a particular name be defined in another object file ("external references to functions and objects" in C89, and some mentions in C99 too). –  Steve Jessop Feb 14 '11 at 18:44
    
Thanks @Steve, that's good to know, but I don't think OP was asking about this :) –  Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 14 '11 at 18:46
    
and even I didn't think it worth mentioning that's it's also used in the C standard to mean another document whose contents are relevant to C and mentioned in the standard (e.g. "ISO 31−11:1992, Quantities and units — Part 11: Mathematical signs and symbols for use in the physical sciences and technology."), and for mentions in one clause of the relevance of a later clause ("forward reference"). I think you're right what the question means :-) This is the one drawback of using English words to mean specific programming entities, you risk ambiguity with the English word... –  Steve Jessop Feb 14 '11 at 18:48
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C has pointers and you can pretty much do anything you want with those pointers, you can deference them, and you change the value of a pointer. In fact pointer arithmetic is quite common technique in C programming. In my younger days as a C programmer references was not a commonly used term when talking with other C developers.

References as a term is very commonly used with Java, C# and Object Oriented Languages. In the context of Java and Object Oriented languages a reference is a pointer to an object instance in memory. With a reference you can't do pointer arithmetic, and that is the key difference between pointers and references in my view.

Pointers allow for pointer arithmetic and dereferencing, references only allow for dereferencing and changing what the reference points to.

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Time to go on a term-bashing spree, because these things always cause confusion.

  • A pointer is a memory address in its own right. Cue fancy diagram for how it happens in memory:

    | Address  | Value          |
    |----------|----------------|
    |0x1111    |0x1112          | <-- Pointer!
    |0x1112    |42              | <-- Pointed value
    |0x1113    |42              | <-- Some other value
    

    I've used a much smaller address size just for simplicity. Basically, 0x1111 is a pointer because its contents are the address of another value.

  • Dereferencing means examining the value of the address held in the pointer's value. Such fancy language can be confusing; basically, if I dereference 0x1111 I look at 0x1112 and get the value out of that address. Why? Because it's really useful and because assembly lets us do it too,

    mov rax, [r8]
    

    Is nasm/intel syntax for "look in r8, find that memory address, follow it and find the value at that memory address and put that in rax".

  • Pass by value. Pass by value means that when you create a function stack frame, which is the stack contents around a function, you copy every value that is an argument to wherever it goes. Registers, stack, wherever. Of course, if you copy a pointer's value, you're copying a memory address and thus creating another pointer pointing to the same memory. This is how functions like this:

    void add(int* x)
    {
        *x = *x + 7;
    }
    

    Work.

  • Pass by reference. What that function above does is essentially pass by reference semantics as you will see them in say C++. The crucial and possibly only difference as the implementation is likely identical at the assembly level is that a reference is something the C++ compiler understands. Since the compiler is the language this is important. C understands pointers and manipulating memory, and so do C compilers, but they'll let you do whatever you like. You can't re-assign a reference, for example,

    void cppadd(int& x)
    {
        int a = 7;
        x = &a; // doesn't work.
    }
    

So, to sum it up, references are on one level a language feature where the compiler understands where the source memory is and prevents modification of that source memory address. It understands you want to play with the value. Pointers are just that, memory addresses holding other memory addresses.

Wikipedia summarises it pretty well:

In the C++ programming language, a reference is a simple reference datatype that is less powerful but safer than the pointer type inherited from C. The name C++ reference may cause confusion, as in computer science a reference is a general concept datatype, with pointers and C++ references being specific reference datatype implementations.

Yes, I have mentioned C++ when this question is only C, but I feel it is prudent to clarify how a term has become somewhat confused with the addition of later languages.

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"A pointer is not a feature of C, it's a feature of x86 and its decendents and was deliberately added to the architecture to support C". What do you mean? The word "pointer" appears plenty of times in the C standard, how is it not a feature of C? How is it specific to x86 and not earlier architectures? In what sense was it added to x86 specifically to support C, and not to support in general the notion of addressable/indexable memory? –  Steve Jessop Feb 14 '11 at 19:03
    
I don't think I know what I mean, I'm clearly chatting nonsense with that statement. Pointers are a feature of C and I believe x86 included them to work well with C. I think. Can't remember where I read that, but I'll leave that out of my answer since it adds nothing to it anyway. –  Ninefingers Feb 14 '11 at 19:08
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A pointer's value is a memory address.

int a;
int* b = &a;
// b holds the memory address of a, not the value of a.

A reference is a pointer with a value (memory address) that refers to a desired item.

int a;
int* b = &a;
// b is a reference to a.

A dereference is a technique of grabbing the memory contents that a pointer references.

int a;
int* b = &a;
int c = *b;
// c dereferences b, meaning that c will be set with the value stored in the address that b contains.

Note that a C++ reference is a different thing than a C reference. A C++ reference is an abstract idea where C++ decides to allow you to use non-pointer syntax for most calls, but will automatically "do the right thing" in passing a pointer when needed.

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as in "C++...":

In some cases, the compiler can optimize away a reference so that there is no object representing that reference at run-time.

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Pointer is an address of some data, e.g. int* a. Here a is really just the address where an int value is stored. A reference, in contrast, is another name for some variable, an alias, e.g. int a; int &b = a Here b is just another name for a: b++ has the same effect as a++.

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int &b = a is invalid in C as the OP mentioned. –  Thomson May 11 '11 at 7:12
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