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When I exit the interactive R shell, it displays an annoying prompt every time:

Save workspace image? [y/n/c]: n

I'm always answering "no" to it, because if I wished to save my work, I'd do that before trying to exit.

How to get rid of the prompt?

Note: see ?save.image

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4… –  please delete me Feb 14 '11 at 18:58
yeah, right up until the time you hit Ctrl-D accidentally and quit R without a chance to save (On Linux anyways, I imagine there's a similar shortcut suicide key on Windows). One extra keypress at the end of a session which could save you a thousand keypresses if it goes wrong? I'll take that. –  Spacedman Feb 14 '11 at 19:08
@Spacedman: it's Ctrl+Z in Windows, so don't ever try to "undo" anything. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Feb 14 '11 at 19:13
In GNU/Linux, start R --vanilla –  aL3xa Feb 14 '11 at 19:46
for what it's worth, RStudio has a preferences hook for this –  Ben Bolker Nov 23 '12 at 19:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 36 down vote accepted

You can pass the --no-save command line argument when you start R, or you can override the q function:

  function(save = "no", status = 0, runLast = TRUE) 
    .Internal(quit(save, status, runLast))

Put the above code in your .Rprofile so it will be run on startup for every session.

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+1 for .Rprofile, didn't know about it but thats really useful! –  Sacha Epskamp Feb 14 '11 at 22:26
@Sacha So take a look on… –  Marek Feb 15 '11 at 8:32
After I installed the Defaults package and added the above code to my file (running R 2.15.1 on Windows 7), I get the following error: "Error in bindingIsLocked(name, as.environment(find(name))) : could not find function 'find'" –  John D. Cook Jul 2 '12 at 13:41
@JohnD.Cook: good point. Only the base package is available at that point, so I'd have to think about how to work around that. –  Joshua Ulrich Jul 2 '12 at 13:54
The Defaults package has apparently been removed. –  Praxeolitic Nov 29 '14 at 9:43

If you are using Rgui, right-click on the icon you use to start R and click on "Properties", and add --no-save to the command that starts R.


If you are using a different editor than Rgui, you have to pass --no-save to the R command line when starting R

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Haven't found the easiest Linux solution yet :)

On ubuntu add the following line to your ~/.bashrc:

alias R='R --no-save'

Every time you start the R console with R, it will be passed the --no-save option.

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Pretty much my current solution as well. –  ulidtko Apr 1 '13 at 9:14
this will work not only on ubuntu, but in every bash –  Jonas Stein Aug 11 '13 at 9:55

You can escape the "Save workspace image?" prompt with a Ctrl+D.

Thus, if you do Ctrl+D twice in interactive R, then you exit R without saving your workspace.

(Only tested on Linux.)

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Doesn't seem to work on Windows. –  Thomas Jun 28 '13 at 22:02

You could easily add a qq() function to the .Rprofile file

 qq <- function(save="no") { q(save=save)}

I thought that the save option was available with options, but apparently Joshua's answer is best.

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How about just avoiding the prompt by typing q('no') instead

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.. which is even more keyboard hits than answering the prompt :-) –  TMS Apr 23 '12 at 15:01

Get the best of both strategies given by mreq and BondedDust:

Default to not save by adding the following line to your ~/.bashrc:

alias R='R --no-save

But give yourself an easy way to save on exit by adding this to ~/.Rprofile:

qs <- function(save="yes") { q(save=save)}

So now q() quits without saving (or prompting) but qs() will save and quit (also without prompting)

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You can create an alias for the R command:

using bash: alias R='R --no-save'

using csh: alias R 'R --no-save'

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If you feel adventurous enough, you could also edit the startup section at the end of /usr/bin/R, i.e. add --no-save to the exec calls. However, if you need to save your workspace, remember to save.image().

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