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Can somebody explain to me why classes are not first class objects in Java? There are certain patterns that would work really well if it did and I'm constantly writing factory classes with getters and setters and just adding unnecessary cruft to classes just so I can get around to passing instances to methods instead of actual classes to factor out generic bits of code. For example:

public class AsyncBookSearch extends AsyncTask<String,BookItem,Void> {

    public ListView list;
    public AmazonItemAdapter<BookItem> adapter;
    public AsyncBookSearch(ListView l,AmazonItemAdapter<BookItem> ad) {
        list = l;
        adapter = ad;
    }

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(String... keywords) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        new BookSearch(keywords[0],list,adapter).parse();
        return null;
    }
}

I have several such classes and if I want to make the whole thing generic then the stuff in doInBackground() will lead to several extra methods and other kinds of duplication in argument passing which wouldn't be a problem if I could write the following:

public class AsyncItemSearch<T extends GenericItemSearch<S>,S extends GenericItem> extends AsyncTask<String,T,Void> {

    public ListView list;
    public AmazonItemAdapter<S> adapter;
    public AsyncBookSearch(ListView l,AmazonItemAdapter<S> ad) {
        list = l;
        adapter = ad;
    }

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(String... keywords) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        new T(keywords[0],list,adapter).parse();
        return null;
    }
}

Currently I can't write code like that in Java. I have to introduce unnecessary coupling into pretty much every class involved and this just makes things more convoluted because now not only does each instance need to worry about it's own state but also about state in objects completely unrelated to it's task.

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8  
can you explain what you mean a bit more? Classes are objects, see download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Class.html – hvgotcodes Feb 14 '11 at 19:20
3  
I don't really understand what you're saying. There is an object for every class... ClassName.class. The rest of your question is too vague to address. – ColinD Feb 14 '11 at 19:20
2  
They are first class objects. What can you not do with them that you would like to? – Igor Feb 14 '11 at 19:23
    
What is the type variable T even giving you in the example above? How would someone who has a parameterized reference to an AsyncItemSearch make use of T? Why not pass an instance of the parser in directly, or less cleanly, an instance to the Class object for the parser so you can create one via Reflection? – Mark Peters Feb 14 '11 at 19:37
    
@Mark Peters: This was the simplest example I could find. My point is that I don't want to add extra parameters to constructors of classes when they are not required. The logic of AsyncItemSearch has nothing to do with the instance of the parser and I'm adding extra coupling for no reason, even the extra parameters to BookSearch are unnecessary but I have to pass them in to avoid thread affinity issues in android. – davidk01 Feb 14 '11 at 19:43
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't think your question is really about Classes being "first class" objects. I suspect it really has to do with how java handles generics. I think you need to understand type erasure: in your example you essentially want to write something like

void foo<T>{
  T bar = new T();
}

but this is not possible, because at run time, there is no information about what class T actually is, due to type erasure:

When a generic type is instantiated, the compiler translates those types by a technique called type erasure — a process where the compiler removes all information related to type parameters and type arguments within a class or method. Type erasure enables Java applications that use generics to maintain binary compatibility with Java libraries and applications that were created before generics.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I think this clears it up a bit. So basically at the bytecode level there is no vestige of the generic left over so what I'm trying to do is basically impossible with current Java. – davidk01 Feb 14 '11 at 19:44
    
I think this is what fdreger was trying to get you to think about in their answer as well. – Peter Recore Feb 14 '11 at 19:48
    
Yup, and the confusion comes in because you kept using the term Class instead of generic or type paramter. – Peter Recore Feb 14 '11 at 19:50
1  
While type parameters are erased at bytecode level, it's not quite correct to say that all vestiges of generics are removed. In particular, consider "T get()" method where T is a type parameter. Calling that method would look like "Something a = inst.get()" with inst created with "Something" as the type parameter. In bytecode, the same statement looks like "Something a = (Something) inst.get()". Think of generics giving you free auto-casting all over the place to be inserted by compiler. – Konstantin Komissarchik Feb 14 '11 at 20:15

Classes are first class. They are objects of the class Class. They can be assigned to variables and fields, passed as arguments, and even created dynamically.

The problem you are having is generic types are not reified, they are only visible at compile time. Additionally, because constructors are not inherited, unless you know exactly which class you want to create, you can't know if the constructor with the desired arguments exists. One way to work around the problem you are having is to pass in a factory class.

public class AsyncItemSearch<T extends GenericItemSearch<S>,S extends GenericItem> extends AsyncTask<String,T,Void> {

    public ListView list;
    public AmazonItemAdapter<S> adapter;
    public GenericItemSearchFactory<T> factory;
    public AsyncBookSearch(ListView l,AmazonItemAdapter<S> ad, GenericItemSearchFactory<T> factory) {
        list = l;
        adapter = ad;
        this.factory = factory;
    }

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(String... keywords) {
        this.factory.getInstance(keywords[0],list,adapter).parse();
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your way is basically what I'm emulating when I factor things out so it's good to know I was at least on the right track and not missing out on some Java feature that would make things easier. – davidk01 Feb 14 '11 at 19:54

Classes ARE first class objects in Java (of class Class). You can assign them to variables, pass around, return from function etc. I think you meant to ask some other question, but I am not sure what that question could be. Maybe something about erasure versus reification of generic types? An answer to that might be interesting.

An example of the cruft you keep writing could help.

Also, consider the difference between question like 'does X have a reason' and 'does X have good uses'.

EDIT: (answering the comment: "I have not seen a single example of classes being passed around" (btw: I still thing it's a question about erasure versus reification, but this specific comment does not address it). I am surprised you have not. Passing classes in Java is very common. Few examples from really popular APIs that pop to my mind without thinking:

  • Hibernate / JPA entity manager looks up a mapped object on the basis of its class and its primary key; eg: Invoice i = entityManager.find(Invoice.class, 12l)

  • GWT uses a special factory to inject classes that only exist in generated javascript (or otherwise parametrized); The method takes an instance of class to create; eg: Resource res1 = GWT.create(MyResources.class);

  • Spring's ApplicationContext gives you beans based on the class you pass to getBean method; so you would do: DataSource default = applicationContext.getBean(DataSource.class);

  • Class instances are used in the rare cases when C# would use reflection (and Java cannot, as it erases generic types at runtime); the pattern is sometimes called a "class token"

In most of cases above you will see class literal (as a first-class objects classes do have literals in Java) and not a dynamic call, but that is mostly because of the static nature of the language (and of programmers that use it). It is usually considered a good thing to know your types at compile-time.

since Java does not support generics at runtime, you cannot create a generic class on-the-fly. Which makes no difference, since you can create a non-generic class and use it as a generic one.

Answering the other comment: creating and modifying classes at runtime is used commonly, but mainly by Java infrastructure: application servers, libraries. Look at JMockit. You can actually modify an existing class or replace its methods on-the-fly for a duration of a method call.

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1  
Well, can you create classes at runtime (yes, this has practical applications - although they're in the realm of metaprogramming - as some e.g. Python programmers can confirm) in Java? I guess yes, but whether it's practical is another question. – delnan Feb 14 '11 at 19:26
    
I'm not sure what you mean. I have not seen a single example of classes being passed around and new instances of generic classes being created. – davidk01 Feb 14 '11 at 19:29

I would not consider classes to be first class object, instead I would say that Class is a part of the reflection API, since you can not use it as freely as in other, more dynamic languages. I.e. you can't create new instances without reflection.

The main reason is the meta model of java. You can't overwrite static methods, and a constructor that exists in a class does not necessarily exist in its subclasses. This is also the reason why your code new T(keywords[0],list,adapter) would not work, subclasses may not have such a constructor.

Thus, in java, there is no use for class objects since you definitely need reflection to check if you code is valid at runtime.

A different topic are generic type parameters. You can't do T.class because genrics are somehow a language hack in java (and nothing compared to C++ Templates). The main reason for this is compatibilty with older java versions.

However, you can workaround this using the reflection API mentioned above:

public Foo<T extends Bar> {

     private Class<T> barClass;

     public Foo(Class<T> barClass) {
         this.barClass = barClass;
     }

     public T createSomeBar(String arg) {
         try {
             // the bar contract says that subclasses must have such a constructor
             return barClass.getConstructor(String.class).newInstance(arg);
         } catch ... // the contract was violated, do proper handling
     }
}
share|improve this answer

Classes are first-class items. You can call the "newinstance" method on a class to create an instance, or you can ask for a constructor object and use that. Try this code:

public class AsyncItemSearch<T extends GenericItemSearch<S>,S extends GenericItem> extends AsyncTask<String,T,Void> {

    private Constructor<T> searchConstructor;
    public ListView list;
    public AmazonItemAdapter<S> adapter;

    public AsyncBookSearch(Class<T> theClass, ListView l,AmazonItemAdapter<S> ad) {
        list = l;
        adapter = ad;
        searchConstructor = theClass.getConstructor(String.class, ListView.class, AmazonItemAdapter<S>.class);
    }

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(String... keywords) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        searchConstructor.newInstance(keywords[0],list,adapter).parse();
        return null;
    }
}

Call it like so:

AmazonItemAdapter<Book> amazonAdapter = new AmazonBookAdapter();
AsyncItemSearch<BookSearch,Book> s = 
    new AsyncItemSearch<BookSearch,Book>(
        BookSearch.class, myListView, amazonAdapter
    );
s.doInBackground("have", "at", "thee", "!");
share|improve this answer
    
Pretty cool. Any good references on this kind of stuff? – davidk01 Feb 16 '11 at 8:01

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