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Let's imagine I have two threads which execute some database-oriented code in thread-specific TransactionScopes with ReadCommitted isolation level. But there is some table which data should be shared (no duplicates should be created).

using (var transactionScope = new TransactionScope(IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted))
{
   ...//some code
   if (!_someRepository.IsValueExists(value))
      _someRepository.AddData(value);
   ...//some code
   transactionScope.Complete();
}

The problem is both threads may check whether data exists at just about same time and if not - create duplicated data (constrains won't help here: I have to prevent exceptional situation to happen). I guess it is a trivial problem but how is it usually solved?

I see the following schematical solution:

using (var transactionScope = new TransactionScope(IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted))
{
   ...//some code
   transactionScope.IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted; //change Isolation Level
   lock (_sharedDataLockObject)
   {
      if (!_someRepository.IsValueExists(value))
         _someRepository.AddData(value);
   }
   transactionScope.IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted; //reset IsolationLevel
   ...//some code
   transactionScope.Complete();
}

The first problem with this solution is that TransactionScope doesn't support IsolationLevel modification. But let's imagine I use ADO.NET transaction here. Nevertheless I'm not sure whether it works.

share|improve this question
    
Will the Snapshot isolation level help with you situation? This level reduces the locks as modified rows are copied. This way, other transactions can still read the old data without the need to wait for an unlock. –  whyleee Feb 14 '11 at 20:25
    
@whyleee: But my problem is with added records but not modified –  Idsa Feb 14 '11 at 20:37
    
But if you need a lock, the ReadCommitted isolation level locks records with a write-lock from other transactions.. Or not? –  whyleee Feb 14 '11 at 20:44
    
The problem with ReadCommitted is that other transactions will see modifications only after they are committed –  Idsa Feb 14 '11 at 20:51
    
Do you need ReadCommited for some reason? otherwise, couldn't you use Serializable? –  Simon Mourier Feb 18 '11 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I usually solve the exact same problem with a DB constraint and by wrapping the entire transaction in a try-catch with a retry in the catch block. Of course, if it is not possible to restart the transaction for some reason this is not a valid solution (e.g. the transaction is started outside of your control - I'm not sure what you mean by "I have to prevent exceptional situation to happen").

Depending on how long time the transactions usually take you may want to wait a little before the retry or make a couple of retries but as long as the parallel transaction has completed successfully your retry will succeed.

The tricky bit is often how to determine that the exception was caused by a particular constraint violation. This usually requires some empirical testing to determine the exact exception type and some ugly string matching of the exception message.

share|improve this answer
    
I came to the solution similar to what you have described. The one nuance is that I use parallel programming primitives to control parallel transactions. There are places which will surely will cause transaction deadlock in the case of parallel execution, and I do not allow more then one thread to enter these blocks. –  Idsa Feb 21 '11 at 18:24

In this case I would do a double check.

First check that it does not exist, no need for a transaction here.

Then start a serializable transaction.

Check that it still does not exist

if not exists add

commit and close the transaction.

share|improve this answer
    
But what if the code is already a part of transaction? –  Idsa Feb 14 '11 at 21:28
    
You should try to reorganise your code to have very short transactions. You appear to have too much code in a single transaction. –  Shiraz Bhaiji Feb 14 '11 at 21:34
    
But do I have any alternatives if I need to be able to rollback all operations? –  Idsa Feb 14 '11 at 21:46
    
You can write compensating code to undo the changes, but that may be alot of work. You need to look at the design of your app and how much data you are changing in a single transaction –  Shiraz Bhaiji Feb 14 '11 at 21:49
    
I like your ideas regarding double-check and serializable transaction. But it is too restrictive. I had such an implementation and there were too many locks. I hoped there are some alternative solutions (my problem looks rather trivial from my point of view). –  Idsa Feb 14 '11 at 21:51

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