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What is the proper (or a good) design if I need to have a class that loads its data from a file (while keeping the load functions in a different class)?

This is what I have now. Can't help but think there is a better way to structure it all though. The part that is tripping me up is when Loader has to call a method in Primary before continuing.

class Primary {
  public int x1, x2, x3;   //data that is read from file or calculated

  public void LoadPrimary {
    Loader L = new Loader();
    L.Load(this);   //pass self as parameter (this can't be the  best way though)
  }

  public void DoStuff() {
    x1++; x2--;
  }
}

class Loader {
  public void Load(Primary PrimToLoad) {
    PrimToLoad.x1 = 2; PrimToLoad.x2 = 4; 
    PrimToLoad.DoStuff();   //call a method in the calling class (better way for this?)
    PrimToLoad.x3 = 6;
  }
}

class Stub {
  public void SomeMethod() {
    Primary P = new Primary();
    P.LoadPrimary();
  }
}

In my real code I am using the Loader class to encapsulate a few different formats read from various sources (so there are multiple Load functions), otherwise I would just include the function in Primary and be done with it. Is there a way to have the Loader class return the Primary instead of void (where now it is passing a Param). It seems too "coupled" to be good design this way.

Any suggestions on a better way to accomplish this scenario? I assume it is pretty common but just don't know enough about class design or terminology to find an answer on google/SO/etc (how do you search the dictionary for a word you can't spell).

Updates/Notes
Both the answers (so far) point towards Factory pattern. Does that mean that for each Load method I have to have a separate class? Seems like overkill in my particular case. Doesn't that also imply that my Stub class has to know/decide the format of a file (so it can call the correct factory class) instead of just letting the Primary class worry about it? Seems to be trading coupling for encapsulation.

Definitely know that I should be using properties (am actually) and an interface (am actually) but wanted to simplify it down for the question. Didn't think about the injection aspect which is a good suggestion.

If anyone can update their answer to show how multiple load functions would work (please keep them simple) I will most likely accept. I am also considering moving the load functions back into the Primary class as an alternative solution.

share|improve this question
    
I think it isn't a good method to execute any logic in classes that responsible for loading data (Data Access Layer, like your Loader class). –  whyleee Feb 14 '11 at 21:26
    
@whylee - Definitely agree with you. Thats why I tried to put the DoStuff function in the Primary class and not in the Loader class. Just didn't know if that was the correct way. –  ktharsis Feb 14 '11 at 22:41
    
If it's possible for you, in LoadPrimary() method you can first call Loader.Load() method and then DoStuff() method. –  whyleee Feb 14 '11 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks like a pretty straightforward example of the Factory pattern. You don't want the object being created to know about the factory though. So rip out LoadPrimary(), and do this instead:

class Primary {
  public int x1, x2, x3;   //data that is read from file or calculated

  public void DoStuff() {
    x1++; x2--;
  }
}

public interface PrimaryFactory 
{
    Primary Load();
}

public class FileTypeAPrimaryFactory {

    FileTypeAPrimaryFactory(File f) 
    {
       ...
    }

    public void Load() {
        var item = new Primary();
        item.x1 = 2; PrimToLoad.x2 = 4; 
        item.DoStuff(); 
        item.x3 = 6;
    }
}

public class FileTypeBPrimaryFactory {

    FileTypeBPrimaryFactory(File f) 
    {
       ...
    }

    public void Load() {
        var item = new Primary();
        item.x1 = 2; PrimToLoad.x2 = 4; 
        item.DoStuff(); 
        item.x3 = 6;
    }
}

class Stub {
  public void SomeMethod() {
    PrimaryFactory factory = PrimaryFactory(<get file>);
    Primary P = factory.Load();
  }

  public PrimaryFactory(File file) 
  { 
       if (<check file format>) return new FileTypeAPrimaryFactory(file);
       return new FileTypeBPrimaryFactory(file);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I have to have an entire class for each FileType? I updated the original question with notes concerning this. –  ktharsis Feb 15 '11 at 21:35
    
@ktharsis, I don't understand how having seperate classes for each file type is a problem. You shouldn't be scared of having too many classes. You should be scared of having classes that do too much. Also, where do you want to detect different file types? It has to be somewhere. Of course you can have a seperate class that generates the factory based on file type. I'll update to show you. –  tster Feb 16 '11 at 14:40
    
It wasn't a problem - I just wanted to make sure I was understanding correctly. Thanks for updating the answer and your comment (it is why I am accepting even though it has fewer votes). –  ktharsis Feb 22 '11 at 16:05

There are literally dozens of patterns designed to accomplish this task, and the one you choose depends on the complexity, flexibility and scalability of your system.

Your solution isn't terrible, but I would recommend creating an interface, ILoader, and implementing it with Loader. Furthermore, instead of "newing" a Loader inside Primary, you should inject an ILoader into Primary, either in the constructor or using a property on Primary. You could still keep a default implementation that news up a concrete Loader if you want. Here's an example:

class Primary {
  public int x1, x2, x3;   //data that is read from file or calculated
  private ILoader _loader;

  public Primary(ILoader loader) {
    _loader = loader;
  }
  public Primary() {
    _loader = new Loader();
  }

  public void LoadPrimary {
    _loader.Load(this); 
  }

  public void DoStuff() {
    x1++; x2--;
  }
}

interface ILoader {
  void Load(Primary primToLoad);
}

class Loader : ILoader {
  public void Load(Primary PrimToLoad) {
    L.x1 = 2; L.x2 = 4; 
    L.DoStuff();   //call a method in the calling class (better way for this?)
    L.x3 = 6;
  }
}

class Stub {
  public void SomeMethod() {
    Primary P = new Primary(new Loader());
    P.LoadPrimary();
  }
}

This method makes your dependencies explicit to your clients. It also allows you to use mock implementation of ILoader for testing purposes. Also, you could easily change your implementation of ILoader to use a database, web service, etc.

Another note is that I'm not particularly fond of passing your object into Loader and letting Loader modify it. I would prefer to instantiate a Loader and ask it to construct an object from scratch. I always get somewhat of an uncomfortable feeling when asking other objects to change the state of my own stuff. This implementation would look like a factory pattern.

One more minor point, I see you're using public fields for your data. This is a big no-no, you should be using C# properties instead. Properties support encapsulation and binary compatibility.

Another data access strategy you might want to look at is Active Record - bad design, but easy to understand an implement and good for small systems.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the original question with notes from your post and additional questions. –  ktharsis Feb 15 '11 at 21:36

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