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I'm trying to wrap my head around using bind/trigger in an inheritance scenario. Here is what I got:

  var MyApp = {};

  MyApp.GrandParent = function (){
      var self = Object.create({}), $self = $(self);

      self.doFoo = function(){
          console.log('Just to asure we can call from child to grandparent');
          $(this).trigger('Happened');
          //$self.trigger('Happened'); //Why doesn't it work this way
      };

      return self;
  }

  MyApp.Parent = function(){
      var self = Object.create(MyApp.GrandParent()), $self = $(self);

      self.doSomething = function(){
          console.log('Just to asure we can call from child to parent');
          $(this).trigger('SomethingHappened');
          //$self.trigger('SomethingHappened'); //Why doesn't it work this way
      };

      return self;
  }

  MyApp.Child = function(){
      var self = Object.create(MyApp.Parent()), $self = $(self);

      $self.bind('SomethingHappened', function(){
          console.log('Client logs: SomethingHappened');
      });

      $self.bind('Happened', function(){
          console.log('Client logs: Happened');
      });

      return self;        
  }

  var foo = new MyApp.Child();
  foo.doSomething();
  foo.doFoo();

Working Example: http://jsfiddle.net/cburgdorf/8fWta/12/

As you can see, we have an inheritance chain starting by the grandparent, over the parent to the child. It works. However, I just don't understand why I can't trigger the events on the $self object. It feels wrong to fire them on $(this).

What I want to archieve is to keep the prototype chain working and fire the events on the $self object. I guess I need to use something like $.proxy maybe but I really don't have a clue.

I know I could also do it like this http://jsfiddle.net/cburgdorf/8fWta/11/ but I would rather keep the prototype chain working...

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2 Answers 2

Andy Edinborough is correct about var self != this.

It looks like you want to store a reference to the jQuery wrapper around your object instances, so I used the flyweight pattern (avoids creating a property on the object instance to store the jQuery wrapper). You can read more about this at James Padolsey's blog.

I also cleaned up your code:

(function(window) {

  var flyweight = $([1]);

  /*--------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

  function GrandParent() {
    /* empty constructor */
  }

  function Parent() {
    /* empty constructor */
  }

  function Child() {
    flyweight[0] = this;
    flyweight.bind('SomethingHappened', function(){
      console.log('Client logs: SomethingHappened');
    })
    .bind('Happened', function(){
      console.log('Client logs: Happened');
    });
  }

  /*--------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

  // setup inheritance
  Parent.prototype = Object.create(GrandParent.prototype, {
    'constructor': {
      'configurable': true,
      'writable': true,
      'value': Parent
     }
  });

  Child.prototype = Object.create(Parent.prototype, {
    'constructor': {
      'configurable': true,
      'writable': true,
      'value': Child
     }
  }); 

  // add methods
  GrandParent.prototype.doFoo = function(){
    flyweight[0] = this;
    flyweight.trigger('Happened');
  };

  Parent.prototype.doSomething = function(){
    flyweight[0] = this;
    flyweight.trigger('SomethingHappened');
  };

  /*--------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

  // expose
  window.MyApp = {
    'GrandParent': GrandParent,
    'Parent': Parent,
    'Child': Child
  };
}(this));

Usage check:

var foo = new MyApp.Child;
var bar = new MyApp.Child;

$(bar).bind('SomethingElse', function() {
  console.log('Client logs: SomethingElse');
});

foo.doFoo(); // Client logs: Happened
foo.doSomething(); // Client logs: SomethingHappened

$(bar).trigger('SomethingElse'); // Client logs: SomethingElse
$(foo).trigger('SomethingElse'); // Nothing happens \o/
share|improve this answer
    
Hi John, thanks a lot for taking time to answer. However, Im still not satisfied ;-) Did you look at slideshare.net/fgalassi/javascript-the-new-parts slide 16ff? I would rather avoid to clutter my objects in the way to write a constructor function first and then implement the methods afterwards. And the second thing. I don't want to share a flyweight var between the objects that was created outside of the objects scope. I'd rather have it like that jsfiddle.net/cburgdorf/FhjnX It serves everything but the prototype chain. But I'd rather give that up I think... –  Christoph Feb 15 '11 at 20:30
    
I'm actually unsure for what I would need the prototype chain anyways? There want be masses of those objects. The only difference I could find is that all the methods will be implemented on the Child instance. Beside that, everything is fine. You can even extend base methods if you have a need for it. So I wonder what do I care for the prototype chain anyway? –  Christoph Feb 15 '11 at 20:38
    
I don't consider the use of constructors as "ugly". I showed a clean way to use constructors with the help of Object.create(). Constructors are used to avoid sharing the event data with all other child objects. Using the prototype reduces the need for manual assignment of methods like doFoo and doSomething from your original example. –  John-David Dalton Feb 15 '11 at 21:02
    
What do you mean by "reducing the need for manual assignment of methods"..as you can see in this fiddle jsfiddle.net/cburgdorf/FhjnX you don't have to assign those manually...they just happen to be on the Child instance.. –  Christoph Feb 15 '11 at 21:23
    
In GrandParent and Parent you manually assign self.doFoo = ... and self.doSomething = ..., though I guess it's like a Factory function to create multiple GrantParent, Parent, and Child objects. The way you have it creates a disconnect between the objects. For example if I created var bar = new MyApp.Child; later I couldn't simply add a method to the Child object and have it inherited by both foo and bar. –  John-David Dalton Feb 15 '11 at 22:17

I think the problem is in your Object.create() method: self !== this. It looks like self is being used as a prototype for the instance that is being created, and is not actually the same instance being returned.

It looks like this is what's happening in Child:

  1. MyApp.GrandParent() returns an instance of GrandParent--we'll call it a.
  2. The fields and functions of a are used to propogate a new instance of Parent--we'll call it b.
  3. The fields and functions of b are used to propogate a new instance of Child--c.

So the $self reference in MyApp.GrandParent.doFoo is actually a reference to a--the original object, and this is a reference to c--the current object. That's why $(this).trigger(...) works and $self.trigger(...) doesn't.

In this fiddle, http://jsfiddle.net/andyedinborough/s8hV7/1/, I wrote the Object.create(...) function to simply return the instance it was given, and $self.trigger(...) works.

share|improve this answer
    
This works also: jsfiddle.net/andyedinborough/s8hV7/2. It may also be more clear, because there are no object references to get mixed up. –  Andy Edinborough Feb 14 '11 at 22:40
    
Hi Andy, thank you for your answer. However, it leaves me unsatisfied ;-) Your first example is considered ugly (ATTENTION: No personal critic in here!) and the reason why we have Object.create() in ECMA5 in the first place. Just have a look at slide 16ff here: slideshare.net/fgalassi/javascript-the-new-parts And your second example actually breaks the inheritance chain, so if you inspect it, you will notice that all methods happen to be implemented on the same object. :-( –  Christoph Feb 15 '11 at 7:36
    
I apologize for my ignorance of ECMA5. :] I found this post helpful: uxebu.com/blog/2011/02/23/… –  Andy Edinborough Feb 23 '11 at 16:04

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