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Is it possible to set the opacity of a background image without affecting the opacity of child elements?

Example

All links in the footer need a custom bullet (background image) and the opacity of the custom bullet should be 50%.

html

<div id="footer">
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#">Link 1</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link 2</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link 3</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link 4</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Link 5</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>  

css

#footer ul li {
    background: url(/images/arrow.png) no-repeat 0 50%;
}  

What I've Tried

I tried setting the opacity of the list items to 50%, but then the opacity of the link text is also 50% - and there doesn't seem to be a way to reset the opacity of child elements:

#footer ul li {
    background: url(/images/arrow.png) no-repeat 0 50%;
    /* will also set the opacity of the link text */        
    opacity: 0.5;
}

I also tried using rgba, but that doesn't have any affect on the background image:

#footer ul li {
    /* rgba doesn't apply to the background image */
    background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.5) url(/images/arrow.png) no-repeat 0 50%;
}
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stackoverflow.com/a/6502295/218125 –  Cypher Mar 22 '13 at 16:35
    
related stackoverflow.com/q/806000/759452 –  Adrien Be Feb 27 at 8:23
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11 Answers 11

This will work with every browser

div {
 -khtml-opacity:.50; 
 -moz-opacity:.50; 
 -ms-filter:"alpha(opacity=50)";
  filter:alpha(opacity=50);
  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(opacity=0.5);
  opacity:.50; 
}

If you don't want transparency to affect the entire container and its children, check this workaround. You must have an absolutely positioned child with a relatively positioned parent.

Check demo at http://www.impressivewebs.com/css-opacity-that-doesnt-affect-child-elements/

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I think you need to change the ” quotes in the above code to " in order for it to work when straight copy-pasted. –  nsantorello Feb 6 '12 at 16:44
4  
is this answer still the best solution people have found to the problem of: "how to make a child element not inherit the parent element's CSS opacity value"? I need the child to really be a child.. and in the document flow... and also do not want to bring in javascript/flash for this; prefer pure CSS. –  govinda May 14 '12 at 19:58
7  
Doesn't work in Lynx :P –  alex Jul 31 '12 at 5:24
8  
@alex you have to add -lynx-opacity: 0.5. Also, make sure you adjust the volume level of the background image to 50% in the aural stylesheet (div{volume:50%}) for best accessibility of screen-reader users. –  Camilo Martin Sep 1 '12 at 14:34
3  
@alex Lynx? Real men telnet to port 80! –  Chris Wesseling Sep 3 '13 at 20:16
show 3 more comments

Take your image into an image editor, turn down the opacity, save it as a .png and use that instead.

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5  
Hmm... i just downvoted, but look at this accepted answer: stackoverflow.com/a/6502295/131809 upvoted 10 times, and pretty much identical. –  Alex Nov 7 '12 at 15:56
4  
This is a good option, no idea why so many downvotes. If I could upvote this twice I would. A child element of a partially opaque parent element is going to be partially opaque, and should be. All "workarounds" are bugs that should eventually be fixed. –  RobW Nov 28 '12 at 21:17
    
It is not a "good" option as it fires +1 http request and needs to load additional data. –  mystrdat Dec 11 '12 at 15:44
4  
@mystrdat You're already downloading the image, this isn't an extra request. –  brad Feb 22 '13 at 4:47
1  
@mystrdat But he is already downloading the arrow image. You haven't provided a non-image solution, so that was my point. He's already downloading the arrow image, it might as well come as needed, which would not be an extra request. I'm not understanding where you're coming from. –  brad Mar 2 '13 at 21:17
show 8 more comments

If you are using the image as a bullet, you might consider the :before pseudo class.

#footer ul li {
}

#footer ul li:before {
    content: url(/images/arrow.png);
    filter:alpha(opacity=50);
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(opacity=0.5);
    opacity:.50;
}
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2  
Filter is only an IE solution –  Hussein Feb 14 '11 at 21:48
    
I think this is probably the best solution. It is a pure CSS solution. It's also possible to hack IE7 support using *zoom: expression( … ); (see :after and :before css pseudo elements hack for IE 7), but IE7 is finally becoming passé. –  thirdender Aug 31 '13 at 18:34
    
IEs filter doesnt work in pseudo elements. –  Marcel Mar 11 at 12:53
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You can put the image in the div:after or div:before and set the opacity on that "virtual div"

div:after {
  background: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/owl1.jpg);
  opacity: 0.25;
}

found here http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/transparent-background-images/

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Just to add to the above..you can use the alpha channel with the new color attributes eg. rgba(0,0,0,0) ok so this is black but with zero opacity so as a parent it will not affect the child. This only works on Chrome, FF, Safari and....I thin O.

convert your hex colours to RGBA

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3  
This won't work with the background-image as requested by the OP. –  Torsten Walter Aug 2 '12 at 23:41
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To really fine-tune things, I recommend placing the appropriate selections in browser-targeting wrappers. This was the only thing that worked for me when I could not get IE7 and IE8 to "play nicely with others" (as I am currently working for a software company who continues to support them).

/* color or background image for all browsers, of course */            
#myBackground {
    background-color:#666; 
}
/* target chrome & safari without disrupting IE7-8 */
@media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) {
    #myBackground {
        -khtml-opacity:.50; 
        opacity:.50;
    }
}
/* target firefox without disrupting IE */
@-moz-document url-prefix() {
    #myBackground {
        -moz-opacity:.50;
        opacity:0.5;
    }
}
/* and IE last so it doesn't blow up */
#myBackground {
    opacity:.50;
    filter:alpha(opacity=50);
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(opacity=0.5);
}

I may have redundancies in the above code -- if anyone wishes to clean it up further, feel free!

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1  
It's unnecessary to target each browser separately, just use the browser prefixes inside a single selector block. With the browser prefixes, the browser will only use only the appropriate CSS property. As time goes on and the syntax for that property becomes standardized, browser vendors will drop support for the prefixes and use the CSS property without any prefix (for example, Firefox dropped support for -moz-border-radius in Firefox 13 and just looks for the standard border-radius property now). IE7 and IE8 are a different story, but that's just IE :-p –  thirdender Aug 31 '13 at 18:41
    
I'd like to know who down voted this and why, please. The vote is useless without informative feedback. I'd like to be able to improve my answers. If it was just because the info was outdated please check the date. :) Thanks. –  code-sushi May 19 at 22:03
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Unfortunately, at the time of writing this answer, there is no way no do this. You need to:

  1. use a semi-transparent image for background (much easier).
  2. add an extra element (like div) next to children which you want the opaque, add background to it and after making it semi-transparent, position it behind mentioned children.
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If you have to set the opacity only to the bullet, why don't you set the alpha channel directly into the image? By the way I don't think there is a way to set the opacity to a background image via css without changing the opacity of the whole element (and its children too).

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I found a pretty good and simple tutorial about this issue. I think it works great (and though it supports IE, I just tell my clients to use other browsers):

CSS background transparency without affecting child elements, through RGBa and filters

From there you can add gradient support, etc.

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The "filter" property, needs an integer for percentage of opacity instead of double, in order to work for IE7/8.

filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(opacity=50);

P.S.: I post this as an answer, since SO, needs at least 6 changed characters for an edit.

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#footer ul li {
  position: relative;
  opacity: 0.99;
}

#footer ul li::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  z-index: -1;
  background: url(/images/arrow.png) no-repeat 0 50%;
  opacity: 0.5;
}

Hack with opacity .99 (less than 1) creates z-index context so you can not worry about global z-index values. (Try to remove it and see what happens in the next demo where parent wrapper has positive z-index.)
If your element already has z-index, then you don't need this hack.

Demo of this technique.

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Do you know why we need to set a less than 1 value for opacity? Is it a cross-browser solution? –  zVictor May 3 at 10:18
1  
@zVictor yes, this is w3c-standardized behavior. See Understanding CSS z-index: The stacking context. –  user May 3 at 14:55
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protected by Josh Crozier Apr 10 at 15:13

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